What kind of doctor sees somebody for temporomandibular joint syndrome?

A few types. Oral & maxillofacial surgeon, prosthodontist, orofacial pain specialist.
Dentist first. Normally, depending on who might have diagnosed you, I would consider a dentist first. The dentist may decide, depending on his/her expertise, to treat you or refer you to a tmj/tmd specialist, oral surgeon, ent, physical therapist, etc.
Let see. You could go to your dentist and he will refer you to an oral surgeon.

Related Questions

Temporomandibular joint syndrome (tmj) help needed. Dont want to take pills. Wear splint?

Depends. Tmj dysfunction may include a number of symptoms. Treatement of your TMJ problem should begin with an evaluation by your dentist or surgeon with a detailed history of the symptoms, clinical examination and the appropriate diagnostic studies to properly diagnose your problem. The type of treatment recommended will be dependent upon the results of your examination and studies.
Yes. Splint therapy is actually the first line of treatment for internal derangements of the tmj. However, you need a good physical exam first to make sure nothing else is wrong in the joint. Then a custom made appliance fabricated by an experienced dentist is needed.
Necessary. Splint therapy (an oral mouthpiece to help with tmj/tmd) is usually a necessary adjunct to tmj/tmd treatment. It is an excellent part of the treatment, but usually not the only part. Exercises, therapy, and other modalities may be needed in addition to the splint.
Very likely. An oral orthotic (splint) is usually the first non-invasive treatment of choice as it reduces adverse loads on the joints. However, these appliances must be adjusted and balanced over time. It would be prudent to seek a consultation with a TMJ specialist for a definitive diagnosis and treatment plan that best suits your needs.
TMJ dysfunction. The muscles and ligaments that cause your jaw to move are not working smoothly. If you chew gum stop. Eat softer foods next 2-3 weeks. Apply moist heat to the joint area. Stress plays a big role in triggering TMJ problems. Find activities to help reduce your stress level. A splint may help as well. See a TMJ specialist for more detailed help.
Many options. When it comes to TMJ problems, according to the severity of the case, treatment can vary from. Night guards, splints, heat and or steroids therapy..
TMJ syndrome. Temporo-mandibular disorder is the second most frequent cause of orofacial pain. Earache, tight facial muscles, clicking and popping, headache and jaw pain are common symptoms. See an orofacial pain practitioner for a consultation and management of the TMJ syndrome. The simple treatment is all that is usually needed.
A few things. Depends on symptoms, and cause of symptoms. 3 signs of TMJ dysfunction: joint noises, joint pain & limited oral opening. Self treat with soft diet, jaw exercises, massage, heat/cold, OTC pain meds. A splint or physical therapy would be next. Occasionally muscle relaxants, biofeedback. Xrays are done for diagnosis. Surgery usually reserved for serious symptoms not responsive to other treatments.

Temporomandibular joint syndrome (tmj) without pain but lots of tightness--what to use besides guard?

Several Things... You're very fortunate if you are pain free. I generally prescribe muscle relaxants like cyclobenzaprine (flexeril) for muscle tightness. You can also apply moist heat (much better than ice) to your facial or jaw muscles to relax them. Also, over-the-counter non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs such as Ibuprofen (advil) or Naproxen (aleve) may be beneficial.
Stretching. Cold and heat compresses along with stretching the mouth open can help regain a full range of motion and stretch and relax the muscles.
Depends. If you have no pain, you may be on the borderline of the pain starting. You may still have a displaced disc and other issues that need to be addressed- grinding, clenching, headaches, etc. Do you wear a mouthpiece? If you have not seen a dentist or specialist, you should do so to avoid potential pain.
A few things. Self treat with soft diet, jaw exercises, massage, heat/cold, OTC pain meds. Physical therapy would be next. Occasionally muscle relaxants, biofeedback. Xrays are done for diagnosis. Surgery usually reserved for serious symptoms not responsive to other treatments.
See a TMJ specialist. TMJ disorder is a complex medical condition, therefore, it's a good idea to see a TMJ specialist for proper diagnosis and treatment if needed.

Temporomandibular joint syndrome (tmj) -- best website for help?

AAOMS. There are many spurious websites out there with questionable information on temporomandibular disorders, or TMJ problems. For an authoritative, reputable and reliable source of information, check out the american association of oral and maxillofacial surgeons website at http://www. Aaoms. Org/tmj. There's lots of good, accurate info there that should be helpful to you.
TMJ website. Check www. Nti-tss. Com if you are having TMJ pain or discomfort, check with a dentist who treats TMJ for a more thorough and personalized explaination.
AACP. There are several websites that are excellent for finding info and a list of providers dedicated to the diagnosis and treatment of tmj/tmd. I really like the following: the american academy of craniofacial pain www. Aacfp. Org.

What should be done for temporomandibular joint syndrome (tmj) without pain?

Early Stages. Before pain develops, understanding tmd helps. Do you grind at night? Prior trauma? Bad bite? Take care of the causes first. Parafunctional habits such as grinding, chewing gum, biting ice/nails, clenching should be avoided. Stick to a diet with minimum chewing- let your knife and fork do most the work! A night guard is often very helpfu.
Depends. If you have no pain, you may be on the borderline of the pain starting. You may still have a displaced disc and other issues that need to be addressed- grinding, clenching, headaches, etc. Do you wear a mouthpiece? If you have not seen a dentist or specialist, you should do so to avoid potential pain.
TMJ Symptoms. Pain is a telltale sign that something "is wrong" in the tmj. It is best to diagnose and palliatively treat any symptoms that might manifest themselves prior to pain. A thorough evaluation by a dds or omfs with expertise in this area is a best place to start. In the meantime, limitation of opening/closing, massage, warm moist heat, anti-inflammatory meds., and good posture will be helpful.
Depends on symptoms. Depends. If you have painless clicking, just control habits. See a TMJ expert for specific advice.

My sister says she has temporomandibular joint syndrome. Are family members more likely to get the same thing?

Maybe. Contributing factors include stress, hormones, habits, and structural abnormalities. It would depend upon the contributing factors that other family members have in-common with your sister.

My brother says I should get treated because once in a while I get temporomandibular joint syndrome? Is he right?

Maybe. If you have recurrent pain problems in the jaw, it should be evaluated by a dentist or ent, to ensure it is tmj, or what the diagnosis is. Most of the time, it is treated without surgery.
What symptoms. Your brother may be right, but depends upon what your symptoms are and the cause and duration. I would see a dentist or a tmj/tmd specialist, because your "occasional" once in a while symptoms may become chronic and not go away.
Maybe. If your symptoms are minimal and don't bother you much, no treatment needed.