How serious is bladder cancer?

Serious. One can die from bladder cancer if that helps you understand it's gravity. The most common risk factor for bladder cancer is smoking. Do not smoke!
Varies. Some bladder cancers are highly aggressive and can result in patient death, especially those that invade the muscle of the bladder or metastasize to lymph nodes. However other bladder cancers are noninvasive and low grade. These tend to recur in the bladder but often do not kill the patient if they are managed appropriately.

Related Questions

I had BCG chemo for bladder cancer & developed serious infection requiring hospitalization. What other chemo drug can be used?

Ask the experts... Please discuss this with your oncologist; there are so many chemotherapeutic agents available, and without knowing the rest of your medical history, you should have the specialist treating you help you make this call. If you are unhappy with that you can always get a second opinion. Read more...
It depends. Bcg sepsis is a known, yet uncommon complication of BCG treatment for bladder cancer. The next option really depends on your specific bladder cancer - your urologist will be bettre ablet o discuss this with you. The next option may be for intravesical mitomycing, intravesical valrubicin, or possibly cystectomy. Read more...
After BCG. The BCG is attenuated tuberculoisis, and does help many superficia bladder cancers stay put. If your bladder cancer remains not invading the muscle, in the bladder Mitomycin has been used. If it invades the muscle, time for discussion about bigger systmic chemotherapy, bladder preservation, or bladder removal. Read more...

What is bladder cancer?

Cancer. It is a cancer involving the lining of the bladder that will spread into the muscle layers of the bladder if left untreated. It is a malignant condition that requires surgery to diagnose and as an initial form of therapy. Smoking is the most common risk factor for bladder cancer. Read more...
The bladder collects. And eliminates waste produced by kidneys. The lining cells are suceptible to toxins, and those from cigarette smoking can cause the cells to mutate, become visibly abnormal, and tehn invade, and possibly metastasize. Read more...

Can bladder cancer recur?

Yes. Bladder cancers can very aggressive and recur despite treatment with radical surgery and/or chemotherapy. There is no way to be sure who will develop recurrence and therefore constant monitoring is essential after definitive therapy. Read more...

Is bladder cancer painful?

Maybe. Bladder cancer is generally not painful until it has spread to local organs and structures. If it contained to the superficial lining of the bladder without invasion, it is usually not painful. Read more...
Bladder cancer. Early bladder cancer has very few symptoms. Blood in the urine is the reason for initial evaluation of people subsequently diagnosed with bladder tumors. The definitive test remains cystoscopy. This must be performed by a qualified urologist. It can, however, usually be performed in the office. Read more...

How common is bladder cancer?

Fairly... There are about 68-70, 000 new cases of bladder cancer each year; and the most common type is transitional cell(from the inner lining of the bladder). Read more...
More common in men. In 2012, an estimated 73, 510 cases are predicted, with 55, 600 in men and 17, 910 in women. This represents 7% of new cancers in men and is the fourth most common, but not in the top ten for women. Read more...

How is bladder cancer treated?

Surgery or Radiation. The 2 mainstay forms of muscle invasive bladder cancer treatment includes radical surgery or radiation with chemotherapy. If there is no muscle invasion, one can be treated with a bladder medicine called bcg. The actual treatment depends on multiple factors including the pathology report, type of cancer, the size of the lesion, number of lesions present, and spread of disease. Read more...
Depends. On the stage of the disease and aggressiveness of the tumor. This combined with clinical factors influence what is recommended and not all urologist will agree in every patient. Do you know the stage and "grade" of the cancer? That would be a start to a formal recommendation. Read more...