What kind treatment can somebody get for prostate cancer?

Active surveillance. For low risk prostate cancer i think it is also very important to mention the option of active surveillance as an option as well.
Many options. For early prostate cancer chocies are surgery (open or robotic) or radiation (external or seeds) commonly. For more larger cancers or involvement of nodes radiation with hormone thearpy is effective. For cancers that have recurred or spread elsewhere, hormones can be very effective. Additional options for advanced cases include immunotherapy, chemotherapy, clinical trials.
Several. There are several treatment options available for patients with prostate cancer. W#hich method is recommended depends on the type of cancer, your blood test results (psa), and rectal exam. Definitive treatment options include observation, radical surgery, radiation, and freezing the cancer (cryotherapy). Noncurative treatment options include hormonal manipulation or removal of the testes.

Related Questions

I had prostate cancer radiation treatment, last psa test was. 58. If cancer do reoccur what kind symptoms will I get physically, feel, notice etc.?

Varies. If you are following psa, and your cancer recurs, vey often the patient is asymptomatic - the only symptom may be anxiety about the test result. Otherwise symptoms have to do with sight of recurrence- most common is bone pain or fracture. Read more...
Psa. Unlikely you will feel symptoms of recurrence unless very rapidly growing ca. The psa is the first sign of possible recurrence, very important to get psa checks on regular basis. Read more...

My fiancee, 31, has prostate cancer and we are trying to conceive. Is this still likely? He hasn't undergone any kind of treatment at this point.

It depends. It depends if the disease has affected his sperm he will definitely need a semen analysis. Another thing to look at is frezing (banking) his sperm as the treatment may make him sterile. Read more...
Bank sperm now. That is young for a man to get prostate cancer and it makes me concerned that it needs to be treated soon due to its likely risky and aggressive nature. It may b less aggressive but it is a rare scenario due to his age. Therefore he should bank sperm get treatment as needed in the near future. Even without a prostate his sperm can be extracted down the road from his testicles. Read more...
Depends on tx. If only the prostate is treated and no chemotherapy or hormonal therapy is needed, his sperm should remain unaffected but he may not be able to ejaculate enough to impregnate naturally. A urologist can discuss other ways to get sperm now or in the future. Read more...
Prostate cancer. Although prostate cancer is quite unusual at 31 years of age, it can occur this young. If he has been diagnosed by a urologist by means of transrectal biopsies of the prostate, then he almost certainly was advised to have radical prostatectomy. This surgery would render him unable to impregnate by intercourse although assisted reproductive methods would be available to you. Read more...

Do prostate cancer victims usually choose not to get treatment if they are very old, like over 90 years old?

Generally not. Any treatment for prostate cancer requires a careful assessment of risk and benefit. There is no age cutoff for cancer treatment, but most guidelines for prostate cancer treatment recommend a life expectancy of greater than 10 years. Those expected to live less than this are likely to derive little benefit from treatment. Read more...
Yes. At 90, quality of life is everything. Therapy is aimed at relieving symptoms. We cannot extend life by treating prostate cancer at 90. Read more...

What to do if I'm a 58 year old man with prostate cancer, I'm undergoing radiation treatment and lupron (leuprolide), I get hot flashe?

Side effect. The most common side effect of Lupron (leuprolide) is hot flashes. Unfortunately there is not much to do about it. The good news is that Lupron (leuprolide) is stopping your prostate cancer from being active. Lupron (leuprolide) in addition to radiation has been shown to work better than radiation alone for some patients with prostate cancer. . Read more...

My dad (age 61) has aggressive stage 4 prostate cancer after radical prostatectomy, and will not get any treatment. How long is he likely to live?

Here are some ... Sorry to hear the sad news of your dad. Who decided not to get any Rx? Your dad or Doc or both? If Doc or both, he would be in the real terminal stage & hard to live longer than 4-6 months; if by himself & still fighting to live on, he may still have some existing strength to live > 6 months. So, ask Doc along the course of his last days of life so he may cope with such to preserve quality dignity. Read more...

My dad is 68 years old. Recently, he was dignosed with advanced prostate cancer with skeletal bone metastasis. What kind of hormone therapy shall he use? Is orchiectomy ok?

Yes. Orchiectomy is nearly instantly effective in reducing testosterone levels and can be done as an outpatient. Alternatives include injections (lhrh agonists) to reduce testosterone levels. These are relatively expensive over the long term, but preserve the testicles which is why many men prefer this option. Surgery is permanent whereas shots can be withheld, but permanent may be best with bone mets. Read more...
Disagree... As mentioned orchiectomy is permanent. There are other chemical options, including estrogen therapy as well as drugs which de-stimulate the pituitary from making lh and fsh. No direct proof confirms that testosterone per se is a cause. It may more be 5-dht. Men who lack 5-a-reductase do not get bald or prostate ca. Therefore drugs that block conversion to 5-dht may be used in tandem. Read more...
D/W your oncologist. Many options available for metastatic prostate ca- medical and surgical therapy. Orchiectomy can be done and will be for sure decrease testosterone permanently. Anti androgen tx like- Lupron (leuprolide) injection, oral casodex- or the newer oral agents that are more sensitive like x-tandi , abiraterone- are available. Not too forget- vaccine & chemo are available as well.Pls d/w oncologist in detail. Read more...
Orchiectomy OK but. The standard of care is an lhrh agonist (such as lupron, zoladex) injection combined with a drug taken by mouth called casodex. The Casodex should be used for a minimum of 1 month and then can be stopped. The advantage is that these injections can be as little as once every 6 months. Alternatively, a drug called Firmagon (degarelix) (an lhrh antagonist) can be given monthly without the casodex. Read more...

What about prostate cancer treatment? What kinds of issues should I think about when choosing a treatment?

Quality of life. Fortunately with early screening (psa, digital rectal exam) prostate cancer is found in early stages for many men. This typically leaves men with many options for treatment. I would recommend considering all treatment options and paying close attention to potential side effects that may be associated with each treatment. There is no one size fits all treatment. Read more...
Quality of life. Please see my response about a very similar question. Read more...
Side effects. In early stage prostate cancer all treatments are equal, so the question is what are the possibilities of the lasting permanent side effect. The two that men worry about is incontinence and impotence. Look up the percentage of these as well as bladder and rectal issues to help guide your decision. Read more...
Several factors. There are a number of factors that one should consider in the treatment of prostate cancer. The first is whether or nor the cancer needs treatment as many are slow growing. So, you need to consider the psa level, gleason score, and stage of the cancer. You also need to consider your age, personal health, personal wishes, and the potential side effects of each treatment. Read more...
Medical Treatment. For localized prostate ca, the treatment is local(make sense): radiation or surgery cures most(again depending on risk). For late stages, the treatment is more complicated, particularly for those "asymptomatic" patients, those with a rising psa despite of hormonal therapy. No standard answears, but I have used a variety of therapies, including "alternative" therapy. However, all are anectodal, no. Read more...
Beware of "new" And "improved" technology, that in fact is high cost and has limited long term follow up about late effects. Both surgical methods and radiotherapy suffer from the technical enthusiasm that lacks proven patient benefit. Just because it is high tech does not make it better. Most gleason 6 or less; psa 4 or less can be "watched and waited". Read more...
Informed decision. I begin most consults for low to intermediate risk prostate cancer patients discussing how the most stressful aspect about the diagnosis is trying to figure out what if anything should be done about it. The previous answers are all correct. I'd only add to remember that you are your best advocate and ultimate decision maker. Be sure that you have been presented with all standard options, pros&cons. Read more...