Are some people more prone to getting rectal cancer?

Yes. People over age 50 with high-fat, low-fiber diet ("western') are at increased risk for developing polyps which can turn cancerous over time. Alcohol intake may be linked and patients with inflammatory bowel disease are also at a higher risk. Family history can increase the risk in patients too.

Related Questions

Do a lot of people get rectal cancer?

Relatively, yes. Colon and rectal cancer is the 3rd most common cancer in the United States. It is the 2nd leading cause of cancer related deaths. Estimates for 2012 are 103, 170 colon & 40, 290 rectal cancer. Overall there is a 1 in 20 lifetime risk of developing colon or rectal cancer. Rectal cancers alone are relatively common. In comparison, rectal cancer is as common as leukemia (44, 600). Read more...

Can I get rectal cancer at the age of 20 years?

Yes. You can get rectal cancer in a young age and it is usually more aggressive. Read more...
Unlikely. A few people have genetic disorders and may develop colon/rectal cancer at an early age, otherwise it is uncommon before the age of 40 or so. Read more...

Lynch syndrome, related to rectal cancer, how likely is it that if someone has this they will get cancer? How many people APPROXIMATELY are fine?

Lynch syndrome. Lynch syndrome is also known as hereditary non-polyposis colorectal cancer. Individuals with HNPCC have about an 80% lifetime risk for colon cancer. It is a genetically inherited cancer syndrome that has a greater than 50 % chance of being passed from a parent to an affected child. . Read more...

Does everyone who gets colon or rectal cancer get polyps first?

Yes. The typical colon and rectal cancers, or adenocarcinomas, start as polyps. That's precisely why getting a screening colonoscopy by age 50 is so important. Read more...
Most do. Most colorectal cancers arise in adenomatous polyps, which are the type of polyps that are examined for and removed in colonoscopy. Data now shows that removal of colorectal polyps decreases coloretcal cancers as well as the risk of dying from a colorectal cancer. Less frequently, colorectal cancers can be founs that do not arise from polyps. This most often happens in inflammatory bowel disease. Read more...

Is it possible to get hernia after surgery for rectal cancer?

Yes. Any abdominal operation may be complicated by the subsequent development of an incisional hernia; this is more common with midline incisions. Other factors that may increase this risk include obesity, wound infections, postoperative chemotherapy, steroid use, and malnutrition. Read more...
Yes. Incisional hernias are possible after any kind of abdominal or pelvic surgery. Read more...

What is ovax vaccine and can someone with stage 1c rectal cancer get the vaccine?

For ovarian cancer. My understanding of ovax is that it is for ovarian cancer. It is a vaccine made from your own tumor cells. It is in the testing phase and is not available to the general public as yet. No one has proven that injecting a patient with their own tumor cells will cause the immune system to react against the cancer, but that is the idea behind it. Read more...

I just found out my grandmother has rectal cancer. Is it cureable? Can she get rid of it? Not real familiar with it. What is the best treatment?

Depends. The answer to you questions depends on a lot of things. There is a lot of information needed to be able to answer our questions. Treatment options depend on the size, the actual location, her health and overall condition. I would recommend asking these questions directly to her surgeon and oncologist. Read more...
Depends on stage. I need more information to answer your question. Rectal cancer that is early and has not spread is often curable. The treatment is surgical resection often preceded by radiation therapy. Chemotherapy may be necessary as well, depending upon the stage of the cancer. The important thing is to be sure she is in the hands of a good surgeon and medical and radiation oncology medical specialists. Read more...