Can MRI detect deep vein thrombosis?

Yes but why ? Peripheral deep vein thrombosis is detected by safer, cheeper , and quicker doppler ultrasound sonography. Mri is not used for that purpose but vascular MRI is a great tool in detection of intracranial vascular problems.
Likely. But ultrasound is cheaper, effective, available, and accurate.
Yes but. An MRI can detect DVT but it is not the procedure of choice because it is expensive, not always readily available and takes time to do and process the results. A venous ultrasound is the preferred test to diagnose DVT with an accuracy over 95% if the DVT is between the groin and lower calf. If the DVT is above the groin then a ct or mr(mrv) would be a good alternative.

Related Questions

Whta are the symptoms of deep vein thrombosis?

Variable. Sometimes there are no symptoms. Typical symptoms include leg swelling or pain in the legs, especially the calves. Read more...
DVT symptoms. Dr. Simpson is right, sometimes dvts have no symptoms whatsoever (unfortunately frequently). The classic symptoms of DVT are pain and swelling in the calf. Sometimes they are also associated with redness and warmth. Again, though, there may be no symptoms at all. Read more...
Pain & swelling. Symptoms can be none. The most common symptom is pain / ache in upper calf and or behind knee. Swelling, tenderness and redness in the leg can occur. Read more...

What are the symptoms of deep vein thrombosis?

Sure! Sudden onset of one sided calf swelling with pain, in the setting of prolonged immobility is the typical history. Read more...
Deep vein thrombosis. Commonly, deep vein thrombosis causes pain and swelling but sometimes they will only cause one or the other. Occasionally, they cause no symptoms. If a blood clot is small and in what we call calf veins, you might only get pain without swelling. If the clot is only blocking part of the vein, but not all of it, you also might get no swelling. Read more...

Please help! What are the signs of deep vein thrombosis?

Pain and swelling. The most common symptom of DVT is pain and the most common physical finding is swelling. However, not everyone has these. If you have unexplained swelling with or without calf or thigh pain then a venous ultrasound would be indicated to look for a dvt. Sometimes even a ct scan or mrv is necessary. The bottom line is, if DVT is considered, then proper testing is required. Read more...

What to do if I have deep vein thrombosis, what should I do?

Anticoagulation. If you think you might have a DVT, you need to go to the ER immediately and have a further work up- ie d -dimer test, doppler ultrasounds or CT angio of the chest to rule out a Pulmonary embolism. If the diagnosis is already made- you need to be anticoagulated - ie be placed on Coumadin (warfarin) or IV Heparin in the hospital to prevent a Pulmonary embolism. Read more...
DVT. If you have a deep vein thrombosis, it should be treated with anticoagulation. Depending on your circumstances and what the underlying cause is or what other comorbidities you have, the American Venous Forum has different guidelines as to what agents are recommended, i.e. subcutaneous lovenox or heparin, coumadin (warfarin) or the newer Factor Xa inhibitors, among others. Read more...
Anticoagulation. There are two kinds of blood clots-superficial and deep. Deep is the more serious and is also called dvt. The treatment for DVT is to first make the diagnosis usually with a venous ultrasound or cat scan. Next patients are placed on blood thinners of which there are many including heparin, coumadin, (warfarin) lovenox, pradaxa, xaralto, etc, the duration of treatment is dependent on many factors. Read more...

I'm starting to think I have deep vein thrombosis? Any advice?

Pain and swelling. The most common symptom of DVT is pain and the most common physical finding is swelling. However, not everyone has these. If you have unexplained swelling with or without calf or thigh pain then a venous ultrasound would be indicated to look for a dvt. Sometimes even a ct scan or mrv is necessary. The bottom line is, if DVT is considered, then proper testing is required. Read more...

What should you do if you think you may have deep vein thrombosis?

Get an ultrasound. If you have risk factors (e.g., recent surgery, long plane flight, cancer) and if you have pain or swelling in your leg, you should consult with your primary physician. He/she may order an ultrasound to look at the veins in your leg and pelvis. Ultrasound with doppler is the best test for identifying blood clots in the legs. Read more...
See a doctor. If you are worried hat you have a deep venous thrombosis (dvt), seek attention so you can either be treated, if necessary, or put your mind at rest. Don't wait. Read more...
Why are you worried. See a physician right away. A venous ultrasound exam will be definitive. Read more...

What is deep vein thrombosis (dvt)?

Blood clot... A deep vein thrombosis, or dvt, is a blood clot in a deep vein (rather than a superficial one). These usually occur in the lower extremities. The concern is that these blood clots can migrate through the bloodstream and end up in the lungs, causing a pulmonary embolism, which can be life-threatening. The treatment for a DVT is usually blood thinners. Read more...

What is DVT (deep vein thrombosis)?

Pain and swelling. The most common symptom of DVT is pain and the most common physical finding is swelling. However, not everyone has these. If you have unexplained swelling with or without calf or thigh pain then a venous ultrasound would be indicated to look for a dvt. Sometimes even a ct scan or mrv is necessary. The bottom line is, if DVT is considered, then proper testing is required. Read more...