Can temporal lobe epilepsy be cured?

Cured? In the hands of an epilepsy specialized neurologist and a specialty trained neurosurgeon, it can be a well treated condition if the focus is truly in the medial temporal lobe and it can be resected. Only those specialists can tell you if the disease is treatable or possibly without symptoms- cured is the difficult word.

Related Questions

How do you treat temporal lobe epilepsy?

Temporal lobe epi. Many people with temporal lobe epilepsy have partial onset seizures or complex partial seizures. Many people with this condition can be successfully treated with medication, such as lamotrigine or levetiracetam. People who cannot be treated well with medication may find it possible to obtain relief with epilepsy surgery. Read more...

Can you die from temporal lobe epilepsy?

If untreated maybe. Death risk far higher if seizure generalizes to grand mal, and occurs while at heights or driving. Also, something called sudep, which is death during sleep. But, if one takes appropriate anti-epileptic drugs and prevents the seizures, these episodes are rare, if ever, and may very well have a normal lifespan. Read more...

Can somebody describe temporal lobe epilepsy?

Very variable. Unusual emotions, fear, anxiety, memories, hallucinations----starring or speech arrest, unusual odor--gastric distress, automatic behaviour with repetition different mesial temporal than lateral temporal ask your neuro. Read more...
Need more words. Simple and complex focal epilepsy are difficult to diagnose, ; represent 40% of all epilepsies. Presentation varies from small motor tics, unusual perceptual disturbances, time-distortion, derealization, panic-like sxs, compulsive behaviors, catatonic variants, atypical aggressive outbursts, obsessions, and much more. See a specialist in 1) epilepsy or 2) behavioral neurology ; neuropsych. Read more...

Does temporal lobe epilepsy cause dyscalucia.

Temporal Lobe Seizur. Temporal lobe seizures affect the temporal lobe which is intimately involved in memory processing. After which, confusion and inability to perform tasks can occur. Calculative ability is in the dominant parietal lobe. You may appear to have concentration and calculation problems after a seizure that affects memory. Read more...
Coexisting. There may be coexisting problems of Temporal Lobe epilepsy and dyscalculia. Unlikely to be a cause and effect relationship. Read more...

What are the unusual features of temporal lobe epilepsy?

Auras. Temporal lobe epilepsy typically had distinctive auras (warning signs) before the seizure, including a rising feeling in the stomach, feelings of deja-vu, olfactory hallucinations (strong imagined odors), and some other symptoms. Read more...
Auras. Mainly the auras (see my other recent answer). It also tends to be very amenable to surgical treatment if meds fail. Read more...

What is the definition or description of: temporal lobe epilepsy?

Szs temporal lobe. A type of epilepsy that includes seizures from either temporal lobe of the brain. Seizures include: auras (simple partials sz) like abnormal sensation of taste, smell, rising sensation from stomach; complex partial sz- alteration of awareness with abnormal movements; + convulsions (shaking with loss of awareness, tongue biting/incontinence). Mri often shows hippocampal abnormality. Read more...
Focal epilepsy. Refers to unilateral onset of a seizure starting in the "limbic area", with components of aura(bad smell, taste, deja vu), followed by altered consciousness, with automatisms (chewing, mouth movements), and subsequent amnesia that episode ever occurred, lasting totally 1-2 minutes, and occasionally generalizing to a full convulsion. Read more...

What is the best advice to give my brother who has been diagnosed with temporal lobe epilepsy?

To take his medicine. Since you are 62, your brother cannot be a lot younger, which suggests that his epilepsy is probably due to a concussion (even if it occurred a long time ago), a small stroke, or another brain lesion. Mri scan may be able to establish the underlying cause and possibly lead to removal of this cause. However, whatever the cause, it is not likely that the epilepsy will stop on its own any time soon. Read more...