Are there some genetic reasons I could get renal artery occlusion?

Yes. There are inherited disorders of clotting that can predispose you to arterial disease in the kidney and elsewhere. Additionally there are familial disorders of metabolism that cause accelerated atherosclerosis. A strong family history of premature arterial disease or heart attacks raises one's suspicions. These conditions can be mitigated through judicious use of medications.
With neurofibromatos. Or with genetic predispositon for atherosclerosis due to inherited hypercholesterolemia. Otherwise not as a genetic reason by itself..

Related Questions

How common is it for somebody to get renal artery occlusion?

Not so common. Depends on your age, BP level- less than 1% of patients with moderate or gr 2 ( BP more than 160/100) high blood pressure will have renal artery stenosis or blockage. More common in caucasians than african americans.Usually don't have to screen for ras unless patient is on multiple medications , unable to tolerate medicines, severe high BP requiring hospitalization or kidney function is affected. Read more...
Depends on age, etc. Renal artery stenosis (ras) typically occurs when there is generalized vascular disease from "hardening of the arteries" or less commonly in fibromuscular dysplasia. It's usually associated with BP that's accelerated or difficult to control, and may lead to decline in kidney function or sudden pulmonary edema. Definitive diagnosis is with arteriography & some cases can be treated or reversed. Read more...

What is the actual prognosis for renal artery occlusion?

Usually stable. Usually it is a slow process allowing the development of collateral circulation i.e. Side branches that bypass the occlusion. The kidney is already shrunken with poor function in most of the cases. But with stable function. Occlusion usually is not openable. Accordingly, deterioration of already poor kidney function is not aggrassive. Check with your doc about the other kidney condition. However! Read more...
Atrophy. If the vessel is truly totally occluded the kidney will shrink or atrophy. As long as the other kidney is ok, you should be too. See a good nephrologist and endovascular suegeon. Read more...

I've developed renal artery occlusion. What should I be watching out for in the future?

High blood pressure. If your artery to the kidney is completely blocked, there is no reason to restore flow. However, you should be sure that it is completely blocked, rather than a very tight narrowing, which would require treatment. The artery to your second kidney should be monitored to make sure that there is not an issue there. Losing flow to both kidneys would result in kidney failure, and dialysis. Read more...

How do you effectively prevent renal artery occlusion?

Placing a stent. Renal artery stents can dilate a stenosed or narror renal artery and prevent occlusion. Read more...
Best. To prevent stenosis in first place. Eat correctly, exercise, control blood sugar, no smoking. See heart.Org and stroke.Org to see best ways to take care of your blood vessels. What holds true for your heart and brain also applies to other blood vessels. Read more...

Can renal artery occlusion be cured?

Yes. It depends on what size artery is involved, where the occlusion occurred, and if there is irreversible kidney damage . Medical treatment may help some people. Some arteries can be repaired or replaced with surgery, or a radiology procedure can be performed to dilate the artery.Cigarette smoking and higher levels of cholesterol increase a person's risks of recurrent arterial disease. Read more...
Can be relieved. Renal artery occlusion, a chronic condition can usually be relieved rather than "cured". Cure usually suggests that problem has completely resolved. Complete occlusion of renal artery would mean non function of kidney and can not be cured. 25% of people have two renal arteries and second artery can maintain function in part of kidney. Optimal treatment is stent placement by x-ray interventionist. Read more...

What are the tests for renal artery occlusion?

Vascular studies. A renal artery doppler, mr angiography, IV contrast angiography, co2 angiography, ct angiography are helpful. Older tests include ace inhibitor challenges, searching for drug mediated creatinine rise. This is not much used. Read more...

How do you typically diagnose renal artery occlusion?

See below. The gold standard for detecting renal artery occlusion is a renal angiogram, which is injecting a iodinated dye into the blood vessel and taking images. The dye itself can cause some reversible renal injury, and should be used weighing the risk and benefit. Other rare but serious complication is cholesterol embolii syndrome. Other tests eg ultrasound and MRI may not be conclusive. Read more...
Renal artery bruit. This is a sound heard by stethoscope in abdomen. Magnetic resonance angiogram (mra) is a non-invasive radiologic study which can demonstrate the occlusion. Sometimes diagnosed by ct scan with intravenous contrast. Finally diagnosed or confirmed by renal arterial angiogram performed by interventional radiologist prior to angioplasty. Read more...

What are the common symptoms of a renal artery occlusion?

No common symptoms. This problem is most commonly found, without symptoms, during testing for high blood pressure. The common causes are chronic occlusion from atherosclerosis or hyperplasia of the artery. Acute embolic occlusion may result in severe flank pain. This is uncommon. Read more...