14 doctors weighed in:

Do doctors see a lot of patients with diabetic ketoacidosis?

14 doctors weighed in
Dr. Matt Malkin
Anesthesiology
5 doctors agree

In brief: Depends on type

Most physicians have at some point in their training encountered patients in dka.
Anesthesiologists see them when requiring surgery for life-threatening infection or as ICU physicians. Also common is honk, a similar disease seen in type 2 diabetics. Both are life-threatening and may require ICU treatment.

In brief: Depends on type

Most physicians have at some point in their training encountered patients in dka.
Anesthesiologists see them when requiring surgery for life-threatening infection or as ICU physicians. Also common is honk, a similar disease seen in type 2 diabetics. Both are life-threatening and may require ICU treatment.
Dr. Matt Malkin
Dr. Matt Malkin
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Dr. Sue Ferranti
Internal Medicine
4 doctors agree

In brief: Quite a few...

Diabetic ketoacidosis occurs when a type 1 diabetic has an elevated blood sugar and not enough insulin.
The body produces ketones and acid builds up in the blood. Treatment involves IV fluids, Insulin (usually IV initially), hospital admission and frequent lab work. This can be life-threatening so emergent evaluation is imperative if the condition is suspected.

In brief: Quite a few...

Diabetic ketoacidosis occurs when a type 1 diabetic has an elevated blood sugar and not enough insulin.
The body produces ketones and acid builds up in the blood. Treatment involves IV fluids, Insulin (usually IV initially), hospital admission and frequent lab work. This can be life-threatening so emergent evaluation is imperative if the condition is suspected.
Dr. Sue Ferranti
Dr. Sue Ferranti
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Dr. Carlo Hatem
Internal Medicine - Pulmonary Critical Care
3 doctors agree

In brief: Yes

Unfortunately, almost on a daily basis we see patients with diabetic ketoacidosis in the intensive care unit.
It is preventable and mostly caused by poor compliance with treatment for diabetes.

In brief: Yes

Unfortunately, almost on a daily basis we see patients with diabetic ketoacidosis in the intensive care unit.
It is preventable and mostly caused by poor compliance with treatment for diabetes.
Dr. Carlo Hatem
Dr. Carlo Hatem
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Dr. James Ferguson
Pediatrics
2 doctors agree

In brief: DM1 presentation

Unfortunately, when a child develops type 1 diabetes it is often mistaken for a stomach flu or other illness until DKA is well under way at presentation to an emergency room. Stabalization and early management are part of both er & regular physician training.
After stabalization they are often referred to a diabetes education program if new, or worked up to explore why the DKA if a known diabetic.

In brief: DM1 presentation

Unfortunately, when a child develops type 1 diabetes it is often mistaken for a stomach flu or other illness until DKA is well under way at presentation to an emergency room. Stabalization and early management are part of both er & regular physician training.
After stabalization they are often referred to a diabetes education program if new, or worked up to explore why the DKA if a known diabetic.
Dr. James Ferguson
Dr. James Ferguson
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Dr. Bennett Werner
Internal Medicine - Cardiology
1 doctor agrees

In brief: Yes

It's part of the training that all doctors receive.

In brief: Yes

It's part of the training that all doctors receive.
Dr. Bennett Werner
Dr. Bennett Werner
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Dr. Vered Lewy-Weiss
Pediatrics - Endocrinology

In brief: Unfortunately, yes

We see DKA primarily in unrecognized, new cases of type 1 diabetes and in children with poor adherence to their Insulin regimens.
Acute illnesses may also precipitate dka.

In brief: Unfortunately, yes

We see DKA primarily in unrecognized, new cases of type 1 diabetes and in children with poor adherence to their Insulin regimens.
Acute illnesses may also precipitate dka.
Dr. Vered Lewy-Weiss
Dr. Vered Lewy-Weiss
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