Is vocal cord paralysis curable?

It depends. Depends on the cause, and is it unilateral or bilateral. There are procedures to make the voice pretty normal and to get rid of the other symptoms, but there is no procedure to make the nerve work completely normally.
Possibly. Best doctor to see is an ENT specialist with interest in vocal cord disorders.

Related Questions

How typical is vocal cord paralysis?

Common. Vocal cord paralysis has numerous causes and can affect speaking, breathing, and swallowing. The left vocal cord is affected twice as often as the right, and females are affected more often than males (3:2). Diagnosis is based on direct visualization. An extensive assessment may be necessary to determine the cause. . Read more...

What are the tests for vocal cord paralysis?

Laryngoscopy. The most common way to diagnose vocal cord paralysis is laryngoscopy in the office. This can be done with a mirror in the mouth, or passing a small bendable telescope through the nose into the throat to look at the larynx. There are fancy electrical tests to measure vocal cord nerve input, but that is difficult and not often used. Read more...

What are the symptoms of vocal cord paralysis?

Voice. Hi. Vocal cord paralysis results from damage to one or both recurrent laryngeal nerves (assume 1). This usually results from neck, lung, or mediastinal tumors, or from surgery in that region. The affected vocal cord is paralyzed. This makes vocal intonation with that cord unadjustable, so there is a raspy, somewhat constant tone from the affected cord (the contralateral normal cord works fine). Read more...

What are the effects of vocal cord paralysis on speech?

Sound hoarse. The vocal cord vibrates to produce voice and song. If it can not vibrate, both voice and song are muted and flat. Severe cases can interfere with breathing. Most cases recover with time. Severe cases may need surgery. Read more...
Hoarse, breathy. Hoarse, breathy, or weak voice are all complications of unilateral or bilateral vocal cord paralysis. Read more...

Will my 1-year-old son recover from vocal cord paralysis?

Vocal cord paralysis. If your baby's doctor diagnosed "vocal cord paralysis" why hasn't your baby been referred to an ear, nose, and throat doctor - preferably one more used to to caring for babies? Read more...

What is the treatment for vocal cord paralysis?

Please see below. Vocal cord paralysis can cause a characteristic breathy voice often accompanied by difficulty swallowing, a weak cough, and feeling short of breath. If both vocal cords are affected, symptoms can include stridor. It can have a variety of causes, and correct treatment depends on the cause. Read more...
One side or both? Vocal cord paralysis can be unilateral (one side) or bilateral (both sides). Treatment depends on if the problems is weak voice, aspiration, or difficulty breathing. For unilateral, treatments include vocal cord injection, thyroplasty (pushing one cord towards the center), re-innvervation. If bilateral, the solution is to widen the vocal cords a little to allow better breathing. Read more...

Are some people more prone to getting vocal cord paralysis?

Yes. If they have certain immune diseases like rheumatoid arthritis or if they have had instrumentation over their vocal cords such as thru trauma or medical procedure like endoscopy or being on a ventilator. Read more...

What are the symptoms of vocal cord paralysis and is there any way to address them?

Please see below. Vocal cord paralysis can cause a characteristic breathy voice often accompanied by difficulty swallowing, a weak cough, and feeling short of breath. If both vocal cords are affected, symptoms can include stridor. It can have a variety of causes, and correct treatment depends on the cause. Read more...
Cough, hoarse, etc. Unilateral (one side only) vocal paralysis can cause coughing with drinking liquids, waking up short of breath or coughing, hoarse voice, and strained voice. There are very good short term and long term treatments depending on the cause of the problem. The diagnosis is easily made in the office by an ENT doctor. Read more...