3 doctors weighed in:

I'm a migraine sufferer and have found great relief from nortriptyline. I recently heard a loud swooshing in my ear for a couple of days. Problem?

3 doctors weighed in
Dr. Bennett Werner
Internal Medicine - Cardiology
1 doctor agrees

In brief: No

The carotid artery normally passes though the bone that houses the auditory nerve.
When air conduction is temporarily impaired, one hears the internal sound which is soft and usually not audible. A "clogged ear" like after swimming, from a wax impaction, following a cold, or changing altitude can cause this. It's not serious. Lying ear firmly down in bed can temporarily reproduce it.

In brief: No

The carotid artery normally passes though the bone that houses the auditory nerve.
When air conduction is temporarily impaired, one hears the internal sound which is soft and usually not audible. A "clogged ear" like after swimming, from a wax impaction, following a cold, or changing altitude can cause this. It's not serious. Lying ear firmly down in bed can temporarily reproduce it.
Dr. Bennett Werner
Dr. Bennett Werner
Thank
Dr. Robert Knox
ENT - Head & Neck Surgery
1 doctor agrees

In brief: Swooshing in Ear

The loud "swooshing" sound in your ear is very likely your heartbeat.
Try taking your pulse to see if the the sound corresponds to your heartbeat. Another possibility is spasm of one of the two muscles in your middle ear, muscles that dampen the eardrum from loud noises. This is called tensor tympani or stapedius myoclonus. This sound will be must faster than heartbeat. See an ent.

In brief: Swooshing in Ear

The loud "swooshing" sound in your ear is very likely your heartbeat.
Try taking your pulse to see if the the sound corresponds to your heartbeat. Another possibility is spasm of one of the two muscles in your middle ear, muscles that dampen the eardrum from loud noises. This is called tensor tympani or stapedius myoclonus. This sound will be must faster than heartbeat. See an ent.
Dr. Robert Knox
Dr. Robert Knox
Thank
1 comment
Dr. Bennett Werner
If the sound was temporary or comes and goes, it would not be due to an aneurysm which, once present, doesn't go away.
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