8 doctors weighed in:
What is the risk of cancer from a CT scan?
8 doctors weighed in

Cole Livingston
Emergency Medicine
4 doctors agree
In brief: Extremely low.
The amount of radiation a patient is exposed to with a single computerized tomography (ct) scan is way below the amount required to inflict the necessary dna damage to cause cancer.
In fact, studies have proven that a pregnant woman may safely receive a single ct with no negative effects to the fetus (although efforts should still be made to minimize unnecessary exposure).

In brief: Extremely low.
The amount of radiation a patient is exposed to with a single computerized tomography (ct) scan is way below the amount required to inflict the necessary dna damage to cause cancer.
In fact, studies have proven that a pregnant woman may safely receive a single ct with no negative effects to the fetus (although efforts should still be made to minimize unnecessary exposure).
Cole Livingston
Cole Livingston
Answer assisted by Cole Livingston, Medical Student
Thank
Dr. Chakshu Gupta
Pathology
1 doctor agrees
In brief: Small but real
Repeat exposure increases risk of cancer due to radiation.
The risk is small but real, and depends on frequency of exposure and your individual predisposition to radiation damage.

In brief: Small but real
Repeat exposure increases risk of cancer due to radiation.
The risk is small but real, and depends on frequency of exposure and your individual predisposition to radiation damage.
Dr. Chakshu Gupta
Dr. Chakshu Gupta
Thank
Dr. Douglas Arenberg
Internal Medicine - Pulmonary Critical Care
In brief: ...and more
I'll add to what they said.
Everything we know about risk from radiation is extrapolated from large exposures like hiroshima etc. This extrapolation requires the assumption that dna repair capacity after a small dose of radiation is the same as from a large exposure. This assumption is not accurate, and therefore, estimates of risk from small exposures (e.g. A ct) are probably greatly exaggerated.

In brief: ...and more
I'll add to what they said.
Everything we know about risk from radiation is extrapolated from large exposures like hiroshima etc. This extrapolation requires the assumption that dna repair capacity after a small dose of radiation is the same as from a large exposure. This assumption is not accurate, and therefore, estimates of risk from small exposures (e.g. A ct) are probably greatly exaggerated.
Dr. Douglas Arenberg
Dr. Douglas Arenberg
Thank
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