17 doctors weighed in:

What sort of problem is antiphospholipid syndrome?

17 doctors weighed in
Dr. Marina Maslovaric
Obstetrics & Gynecology
14 doctors agree

In brief: Autoimmune

Autoimmune means your body produces antibodies - cells that attack your own body.
In antiphosopholipid syndrome the antibody which is made provokes blood clots (thrombosis) in both arteries and veins as well as pregnancy-related complications such as miscarriage, stillbirth, preterm delivery, or severe preeclampsia.

In brief: Autoimmune

Autoimmune means your body produces antibodies - cells that attack your own body.
In antiphosopholipid syndrome the antibody which is made provokes blood clots (thrombosis) in both arteries and veins as well as pregnancy-related complications such as miscarriage, stillbirth, preterm delivery, or severe preeclampsia.
Dr. Marina Maslovaric
Dr. Marina Maslovaric
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1 comment
Dr. Sahba Ferdowsi
Great answer! Wishing you'all the best
Dr. Steven Lindheim
Fertility Medicine
2 doctors agree

In brief: Recurrent Preg Loss

Apa are assoictaed with recurrent pregnancy loss where the pregnancy may be rejected or associated with clotting at the placental site.
It can be treated with blood thinners.

In brief: Recurrent Preg Loss

Apa are assoictaed with recurrent pregnancy loss where the pregnancy may be rejected or associated with clotting at the placental site.
It can be treated with blood thinners.
Dr. Steven Lindheim
Dr. Steven Lindheim
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Dr. Mark Perloe
Fertility Medicine
2 doctors agree

In brief: APS

To make this diagnosis you need to have abnormal test results at least twice a month apart as well as abnormalities such as recurrent pregnancy loss or blot clots (thrombosis) or pulmonary embolus.
If you have not had problems hulu don't have the condition.

In brief: APS

To make this diagnosis you need to have abnormal test results at least twice a month apart as well as abnormalities such as recurrent pregnancy loss or blot clots (thrombosis) or pulmonary embolus.
If you have not had problems hulu don't have the condition.
Dr. Mark Perloe
Dr. Mark Perloe
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Dr. Thomas Namey
Internal Medicine - Rheumatology
1 doctor agrees

In brief: It is automimmune!

Apls can occur in many autoimmune settings (with lupus or spondylitis), or simply by itself.
There are three major types of anticardiolipin antibodies. The IgG class is particularly a problem in pregnant females, becuase these antibodies can clot placental vessels. Igm anticardiolipin antibodies are more serious if elevated in non-pregnant adults because of greater arterial clot risk!

In brief: It is automimmune!

Apls can occur in many autoimmune settings (with lupus or spondylitis), or simply by itself.
There are three major types of anticardiolipin antibodies. The IgG class is particularly a problem in pregnant females, becuase these antibodies can clot placental vessels. Igm anticardiolipin antibodies are more serious if elevated in non-pregnant adults because of greater arterial clot risk!
Dr. Thomas Namey
Dr. Thomas Namey
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Dr. Ted King
Phlebology

In brief: Acquired

Antiphospholipid antibodies (apla) are one of the acquired (as opposed to inherited) thrombophilias (conditions that cause blood clotting).
As others have said, apla can cause miscarriages. It is unusual amongst the thrombophilias in that it causes venous and artrial clots. At one time, it was thought that lupus was the cause of apla, we now know that you can get apla without having lupus.

In brief: Acquired

Antiphospholipid antibodies (apla) are one of the acquired (as opposed to inherited) thrombophilias (conditions that cause blood clotting).
As others have said, apla can cause miscarriages. It is unusual amongst the thrombophilias in that it causes venous and artrial clots. At one time, it was thought that lupus was the cause of apla, we now know that you can get apla without having lupus.
Dr. Ted King
Dr. Ted King
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