I sometimes get sad but is that enough to need to take estrogen to prevent postpartum depression?

Sad or depressed? It is unclear if you are having enough symptoms of depression to make it advisable to take measures (whether hormonal or prophylactic medication) to prevent postpartum depression. Getting sad periodically is normal, especially if there is a reason. In order to address this individually, see a mental health professional with expertise in perinatal issues.
Ppd. Sadness by itself is not indicative of major depression. If u r having other vegetative symptoms such as changes in energy/sleep/appetite, u need evaluated by a mental health doctor for further tx recommendations.
Have you considered. A short course of acupuncture? Have found this quite helpful for many of my patients.
No. Postpartum baby blues are common. They last only a few days and can cause crying, etc but should not lead to decreased appetite, etc. Postpartum depression is more serious and lingers. Estrogen is not used to treat postpartum depression. You need to talk to your doctor.

Related Questions

Postpartum depression and the baby blues. Is all this sadness?

No. The hallmark of depression is a diminished ability to enjoy things that should be enjoyable. If that occurs, the individual needs to see their physician. The blues are typically not associated with this symptom. However, "blues" that persist for more than 2 weeks should be evaluated by your doctor. Read more...

What is the difference between depression, postpartum depression, baby blues, and general sadness?

2 general types. Generally there are two types of depression listed in the DSM5. The first is dysthymia, which is a chronic type of depression that varies little in intensity, and major depression, which varies in intensity a great deal. Read more...

After having my baby my brain feels different. Like foggy. And I'm always fatigue. I'm not sad... or wanting to harm myself or baby I just feel off. My vision seems to be foggy as well sometimes? All Dr's say it's postpartum depression and have me on

Post partum depress. If it is psot partum depression this will improve. It coudl be something else. With pregancy there are a lot of hormone and endocrine changes and sometime after pregancy endocrine problem and remain. You can discuss this with your physician or see an endocrinologist. Read more...
Anxiety, Depression. I understand your distress, going through pregnancy, relationship problems, labor, delivery, taking care of newborn, parenting concerns, lack of understanding and support from your loved ones. “Brain feeling different—like foggy, vision foggy sometimes” indicates feeling overwhelmed. Fatigue is likely due to depression. See a Psychiatrist for Diagnosis, Therapy, Relaxation, Yoga, and Meditation. Read more...

Is there anything I can do to prevent postpartum depression from coming back?

Build up awareness. Awareness of symptoms is one of steps of prevention. You know what you've experienced. While there're no crisis, it's better to start working on back up plan-- people you turn for help to, including mental health professionals; obstetrician, child's pediatrician. Create a "coping card" and once the baby is born a list of people who can help you with the baby and manage the stress. Good luck! Read more...
Good self care. There are things that you can do to help lower your risk of postpartum depression, but still no guarantees that you won't get it. If you do get ppd, seek early treatment as that's the best way to get better quickly. The good news is there's a good prognosis with treatment. Lower risk with a good support network & good self care, including good sleep, healthy eating, exercise, balanced lifestyle. Read more...

How can I prevent postpartum depression?

Have good support. The best way to prevent postpartum depression is to have an adequate support system in place to help you after the birth of your baby. Don't be afraid to ask for and accept help of any kind: from friends, relatives, and professionals if you need it. Try to avoid getting overly tired and doing everything yourself. If you've had depression before, watch for symptoms after giving birth. Read more...
Enlist help at home. Having help in caring for your baby will make things a lot easier. In the first few months after birth, your baby will be feeding very frequently around the clock and having some assistance in caring for your baby or even doing your normal chores around the house will make a world of difference! don't get too hard on yourself and take time to rest. Also, talk to others about how you are feeling. Read more...
Good self care. There are things that you can do to help lower your risk of postpartum depression, but still no guarantees that you won't get it. If you do get ppd, seek early treatment as that's the best way to get better quickly. The good news is there's a good prognosis with treatment. Lower risk with a good support network & good self care, including good sleep, healthy eating, exercise, balanced lifestyle. Read more...
Treat depression bef. If you are pregnant, the medications for mood are safer than the disorder. If you have a hx of pp depression the risk of recurrence is about 70%. Low dose sertraline at 25 mg starting even prior to delivery, and treating insomnia during pregnancy can be important. Don't get behind on treatment and don't be too conservative. Read more...
Medication. The best way to prevent post partum depression is to ensure you do not have depression prior to delivery. If you have had a diagnosis of depression, anxiety or post partum depression, your likelihood of relapse is over 70%. Sleep dysfunction is often the primary clue. Don't go into having new baby already exhausted. Low dose ssri can be helpful and the risk is minimal. Can start after del. To. Read more...
Support. Make sure you have plenty of support through out your pregnancy and make sure you talk to your ob/gyn openly about your concern regarding post partum depression. Engage in therapy or consider a psychiatric evaluation towards the end of your pregnancy so that your treatment could be started early if needed. Read more...
Build up awareness. Awareness of symptoms is one of steps of prevention. While there're no crisis, it's better to start working on back up plan-- people you turn to for help, including mental health professionals; obstetrician, child's pediatrician. Create a "coping card" and once the baby is born a list of people who can help you with the baby and manage the stress. Good luck! Read more...
Limit stress.GetHelp. ~20%of women who have babies get a signif depression/anxiety illness in pregnancy or within 1 year after birth.Monitor closely.Have an expert to go to if insomnia, anxiety, mood changes, changes in yourself develop, which usu start to occur in 3rd trimester...Catch it early! find expert: www.Postpartum.Net or you may write me through healthtap with ?'s or for help to locate specialist near you. Read more...
Get checked. If you think you could be having post-partum depression then you should get checked. It is even more important to get checked immediately if you are having thoughts of hurting yourself or others, especially your baby. Read more...
Why are you worried? If you have had a previous episode of depression, you might wish to talk to your psychiatrist about being on an antidepressant prior to delivery. This would mean minimal exposure to the fetus and could be started approximately one month to six weeks prior to delivery. Otherwise if you've never had depression, particularly postpartum depression, there should be no need for worry. If however you remain worried, then in your situation i would recommend psychotherapy as a way to ward off postpartum depression and i would start that prior to the delivery of your child. Read more...

Should the Lexapro (escitalopram) have prevented me from experiencing postpartum depression this time?

No guarantee. Dosage and individual characteristics determine success. Talk to your doctor. Read more...
Dose dependent. Whether the med works depends on if it is right med for you, best dose, for the severity of current symptoms. If not helping ask doc if you need different dose or change of med. . Read more...

Can postpartum depression be prevented if it occurred in previous pregnancy?

Build up awareness. Awareness of symptoms is one of steps of prevention. You know what you've experienced. While there're no crisis, it's better to start working on back up plan-- people you turn for help to, including mental health professionals; obstetrician, child's pediatrician. Create a "coping card" and once the baby is born a list of people who can help you with the baby and manage the stress. Good luck! Read more...
Good self care. There are things that you can do to help lower your risk of postpartum depression, but still no guarantees that you won't get it. If you do get ppd, seek early treatment as that's the best way to get better quickly. The good news is there's a good prognosis with treatment. Lower risk with a good support network & good self care, including good sleep, healthy eating, exercise, balanced lifestyle. Read more...