What kind of condition is a delayed sleep phase?

Circadian disorder. Delayed sleep phase syndrome (dsps) is partly a genetic condition that results in the delayed timing of sleep with respect to the signal generated by the endogenous biological clock. One's habitual schedule of exposure to light and dark can contribute to and maintain dsps. Moving one's wake-up time earlier by increments each day, evening melatonin, or morning bright light can ameliorate dsps.

Related Questions

What is delayed sleep phase disorder?

Teenage sleep. This is commonly found in teenagers. It occurs when a person stays up later and later and sleeps later and later. Thus shifting their sleep wake cycle so that they sleep more in the day and stay up more at night, it can be treated with chronotherapy - walking the person around the clock to the correct times. Read more...

What's the cause of delayed sleep phase disorder?

Habits, light, genes. Delayed sleep phase syndrome is a partly genetic condition whereby one's sleep-wake schedule is greatly delayed with respect to the timing of one's internal biological clock. Causes include 1) habitually intentionally staying up late (e.g. To play video games), 2) exposure to too much light before bedtime, 3) exposure to too little light upon awakening, 4) genetic predisposition, 5) certain meds. Read more...

How do I know if I have delayed sleep phase disorder?

Chk DSPD signs below. Delayed sleep-phase disorder (dspd), also known as delayed sleep-phase syndrome (dsps), is a circadian rhythm sleep disorder affecting the timing of sleep, peak period of alertness, the core body temperature rhythm, hormonal and other daily rhythms, compared to the general population and relative to societal requirements. People with dspd, equally distributed among adults. Read more...

Can you get drowsy for having delayed sleep phase disorder?

Certainly. Delayed sleep phase disorder means that you go to sleep late and have trouble waking up at the normal time. If you have to wake up at the regular time you will be very drowsy. Read more...

Do we need to report delayed sleep phase as a long-term health condition, or does it go away after being treated? My teen is getting ready to go to college.

Don't know. About reporting, but once better, the problem can stay away with consistent maintenance of appropriate sleep/wake schedule. Read more...
Sleep phase. I don't think this is reportable. However, after successful treatment the person must commit to staying well. This usually involves a fixed rising time and general sleep hygiene. That can be very hard for a college student. Your teen might want to talk to a dorm resident or academic advisor or college health professional on arrival at school for advice on maintaining improved sleep. Read more...