Would it be possible for someone to donate a lung to a cystic fibrosis patient when you are a smoker?

Depends. If your pulmonary function tests show both lungs to have adequate capacity and no significant emphysema then it could be possible. Bear in mind that you both have to be able to live relatively normal lives on the single remaining lung. Both you and the recipient should avoid being in the same room with a cigarette!

Related Questions

Is it possible to donate a lung to a cystic fibrosis patient if you are a smoker?

Depends. If you are a heavy smoker with significant emphysema you may have reduced your pulmonary reserve to the point that you would have a tough time getting by on one lung, ditto the recipient. You would need to have a full pulmonary function evaluation to find out. Read more...

Does a double lung transplant completely eliminate lung problems for cystic fibrosis patients?

It should. Cystic fibrosis is a genetic condition causing significant lung dysfunction. A double lung transplantation replaces the native lungs with supposedly normal lungs, eliminating the problem, but replacing it with problems directly related to transplanted lungs, i.e. Chronic rejection or bronchiolitis obliterans. Read more...
CF Transplantation. A double lung transplantation for CF does treat CF lung disease, but the patient still has cystic fibrosis, affecting other organs, including the GI tract and sinuses. There are a number of lung problems that can develop after surgery, including infections. The treatment regimen will be very different from your usual CF regimen and will include medications to prevent rejection. Read more...

Does a successful lung transplant completely get rid of the lung problems for cystic fibrosis patients?

Yes. A successful double lung transplant gets rid of pulmonary problems for cystic fibrosis (CF) patients. However, all of the other CF issues persist (chronic sinusitis, pancreatic insufficiency, fertility issues, diabetes). The average five year survival for patients who have CF who undergo transplant is around 55-65%. Read more...
It may. Or you could trade one set of problems for another - even successful lung transplants eventually develop obliterative bronchiolitis after a period of time. Be sure that you meet some post transplant patients who are successful, and compare your quality of life to theirs - if your treatment regimen is oppressive and your lung function is bad enough, you may be better of after a transplant. Read more...
CF. A successful lung transplantation will treat CF lung disease, but not other aspects of the disease, such as sinus disease. A patient will still have cf, but typically will not have to continue their usual CF medications for the treatment of lung disease/ the sinusitis associated with CF can predispose the patient to possible infections with pseudomonas. The first year rate of success is around 90%. Read more...
Unfortunately, no. some cases of cystic fibrosis are much more serious and others – some affect the liver as well as lungs. The cystic fibrosis association warns that transplantation may add years but it is not a cure. Read more...

I have cystic fibrosis but I'm wondering about trying a joint (weed) once. Will it effect my lungs/health?

Not a good idea. Depending on your specific disease situation smoking a joint once may or may not affect your lungs. Having CF often leads to lung inflammation and lung damage to start with. The last thing you want to do is exacerbate those by smoking (cigarettes or marijuana). Read more...
Yes, it can. First of all, there is an old saying - try it just once and you'll try it again. Second of all, it can bring on spasms of coughing in anyone, and someone with CF would suffer far more from this happening. If you have gone 40 years without trying it, i strongly suggest going the next 40 in the same fashion. Read more...

Hi I suffer with cystic fibrosis and I also have MRSA in the lungs and I was wondering if it is possible that I can get tattoos..

Be cautious. Speak with your pulmonologist who is most familiar with your current status for clearance, but Pseudomonas colonization in the lungs should not usually prevent you from having procedures performed on your skin. You have listed MRSA as one of your conditions, which may put you at much higher risk for severe skin infection from a tattoo. Read more...

I was born with cystic fibrosis. I'm now 35 and my lung function has gradually worsened the last years. I know that survival age is about 40 and I'm at peace with that. However, I still wonder: are there any recent findings about cystic fibrosis?

Mgt. I would advise following your lung function closely with your pulmonary specialist, optimizing your nutrition, and treating any exacerbations with antibiotics and chest physiotherapy. The use of DNAase has been shown to be effective. Some patients may benefit from treatments specifically targeted to their genotype. The CF foundation is another good resource for patients. Stay well. Read more...
If you're 35, who's . 22? Just curious. On www.cff.org, scroll down to drug development & clinical trials for up-to-date info. Don't make your lifespan a self-fulfilling prophecy. During my cardiovascular surgery rotation in med school, I lost a 40-yr.-old patient needlessly. He'd never sought repair of his reparable Congenital Heart Disease because he'd been told at age 20 that it couldn't be fixed & he'd die at 40. . Read more...

Why do sufferers of cystic fibrosis have heart and lung transplants?

Usually not. Most people with CF have neither, and almost never have a heart/lung transplant if thy do. Both lungs are usually transplanted partially to reduce the risk of infection. Read more...

Would getting a lung transplant let someone with cystic fibrosis play sports?

Yes. Lung transplantation is a very important treatment option for people with cystic fibrosis that is severely limiting their physical ability. If successful, and it usually is, lung transplantation can offer a person with cystic fibrosis a renewed chance to regain the ability and energy to do many activities that others without this condition take for granted, including some sports. Read more...
CF Transplantation. A lung transplantation of both the right and left lung is performed to improve life expectancy of the CF patient. If the transplanted lungs are functioning well, you should be able to participate in non contact sports. Your transplantation division will follow up with you closely to monitor lung function and your overall health. Read more...