14 doctors weighed in:

Is it normal to have severe dry eyes?

14 doctors weighed in
Dr. Pierre Moeser
Internal Medicine - Rheumatology
5 doctors agree

In brief: No

It is not normal to have severe dry eyes.
The condition needs to be diagnosed as it can be due to drugs, environmental factors, autoimmune conditions (rheumatoid arthritis, sjögren's syndrome), and certain other medical conditions. See an ophthalmologist.

In brief: No

It is not normal to have severe dry eyes.
The condition needs to be diagnosed as it can be due to drugs, environmental factors, autoimmune conditions (rheumatoid arthritis, sjögren's syndrome), and certain other medical conditions. See an ophthalmologist.
Dr. Pierre Moeser
Dr. Pierre Moeser
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Dr. David G. O'Day
Ophthalmology
3 doctors agree

In brief: Never

It is not normal to have severe dry eyes.
But there are many potential causes of dry eye symptoms. They vary with age, sex, and the general medical status of the individual. A young person wearing contacts can develop "allergies" to the contact lenses, and secondary dry eye symptoms. An older person with rheumatoid arthritis likely has dry eyes due to the autoimmune process. But all is treatable.

In brief: Never

It is not normal to have severe dry eyes.
But there are many potential causes of dry eye symptoms. They vary with age, sex, and the general medical status of the individual. A young person wearing contacts can develop "allergies" to the contact lenses, and secondary dry eye symptoms. An older person with rheumatoid arthritis likely has dry eyes due to the autoimmune process. But all is treatable.
Dr. David G. O'Day
Dr. David G. O'Day
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Dr. Daniel Chappell
Family Medicine
3 doctors agree

In brief: No

You need to see your primary or an ophthalmologist.
Dry eyes is a very common, but treatable condition that occurs for a variety of reason from medication side effects to the environment. See your doc and your eyes will feel so much better.

In brief: No

You need to see your primary or an ophthalmologist.
Dry eyes is a very common, but treatable condition that occurs for a variety of reason from medication side effects to the environment. See your doc and your eyes will feel so much better.
Dr. Daniel Chappell
Dr. Daniel Chappell
Thank
Dr. PHILIP WALLER
Internal Medicine - Rheumatology
1 doctor agrees

In brief: Typically not

Severe dry eyes suggests less tear formation which could be associated with dry mouth which is a common autoimmune issue called sicca syndrome.
Dry eyes is seen in many other rheumatic conditions such as sjogrens syndrome but usually other issues are present particularly joint pain. See an eye doctor so they can see if decreased tear production is the problem then go from there.

In brief: Typically not

Severe dry eyes suggests less tear formation which could be associated with dry mouth which is a common autoimmune issue called sicca syndrome.
Dry eyes is seen in many other rheumatic conditions such as sjogrens syndrome but usually other issues are present particularly joint pain. See an eye doctor so they can see if decreased tear production is the problem then go from there.
Dr. PHILIP WALLER
Dr. PHILIP WALLER
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Dr. Jay Bradley
Ophthalmology - LASIK Surgery

In brief: No

Severe dry eye is not normal and needs to be evaluated by an eye doctor.

In brief: No

Severe dry eye is not normal and needs to be evaluated by an eye doctor.
Dr. Jay Bradley
Dr. Jay Bradley
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Dr. Beth Friedland
Ophthalmology

In brief: No, not normal

Severe dry eyes is often a treatable condition and no one should suffer with this.
First try to find the underlying cause. Sometimes after lasik, there are dry eye problems. Autoimmune disorders, thyroid imbalance, menopause, all can contribute. Medications, punctal plugs, and even newer treatments to recover meibomian gland function are available. Do not give up hope.

In brief: No, not normal

Severe dry eyes is often a treatable condition and no one should suffer with this.
First try to find the underlying cause. Sometimes after lasik, there are dry eye problems. Autoimmune disorders, thyroid imbalance, menopause, all can contribute. Medications, punctal plugs, and even newer treatments to recover meibomian gland function are available. Do not give up hope.
Dr. Beth Friedland
Dr. Beth Friedland
Thank
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