6 doctors weighed in:

Diagnosed with severe graves 2 years ago and treated with methimazole and atenolol. Doing well now, but is it safe to continue with this drug treatmen?

6 doctors weighed in
Dr. Colin Kerr
Family Medicine
3 doctors agree

In brief: Hyperthyroid Rx

There are risks associated with chronic Methimazole treatment--notably drops in your blood counts or severe hepatitis, which fortunately are not very common.
The question to ask your doctor is whether your disease is likely to subside over time or continue indefinitely. You might want to consider either surgery or treatment with radioactive iodine for disease that is expected to last a long time.

In brief: Hyperthyroid Rx

There are risks associated with chronic Methimazole treatment--notably drops in your blood counts or severe hepatitis, which fortunately are not very common.
The question to ask your doctor is whether your disease is likely to subside over time or continue indefinitely. You might want to consider either surgery or treatment with radioactive iodine for disease that is expected to last a long time.
Dr. Colin Kerr
Dr. Colin Kerr
Thank
Dr. Melissa Young
Internal Medicine - Endocrinology
1 doctor agrees

In brief: Probably

Like any medication, there are potential side effects from methimazole, but most people tolerate it well, even for long periods of time.
But you want to be on the lowest dose that works for you and you need close follow up.

In brief: Probably

Like any medication, there are potential side effects from methimazole, but most people tolerate it well, even for long periods of time.
But you want to be on the lowest dose that works for you and you need close follow up.
Dr. Melissa Young
Dr. Melissa Young
Thank
1 comment
Dr. Moinuddin Mokhashi
Also, in well controlled Grave's, atenolol is usually not needed beyond the initial treatment phase (usually 1-3 months). Discuss with your MD.
Dr. Joseph Rosin
Internal Medicine

In brief: Nothing is safe

All treatments have some risk associated with them. Not treating your illness is also a risk.
Your doctor is there to balance the risk . Treatment varies during the course of your illness your doctor monitors this. There are possibly alternatives to your treatment if you aren't comfortable with the risks you are now taking. The alternative treatments have risks of their own. Ask your doctor.

In brief: Nothing is safe

All treatments have some risk associated with them. Not treating your illness is also a risk.
Your doctor is there to balance the risk . Treatment varies during the course of your illness your doctor monitors this. There are possibly alternatives to your treatment if you aren't comfortable with the risks you are now taking. The alternative treatments have risks of their own. Ask your doctor.
Dr. Joseph Rosin
Dr. Joseph Rosin
Thank
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