6 doctors weighed in:
I recently had shingles. What can I take during my pregnancy to minimize the transmission of the virus to my baby?
6 doctors weighed in

Dr. Craig Keathley
Obstetrics & Gynecology
3 doctors agree
In brief: Not necessary
Shingles are a skin eruption caused by the chicken pox virus that you likely contracted in childhood.
The virus is present in the nerve root supplying the skin area where the eruption occurs. With normal immunity you will also have circulating antibody to the virus that will be protective for the neonate. If you have a suppressed immune system, you should consult your doctor.

In brief: Not necessary
Shingles are a skin eruption caused by the chicken pox virus that you likely contracted in childhood.
The virus is present in the nerve root supplying the skin area where the eruption occurs. With normal immunity you will also have circulating antibody to the virus that will be protective for the neonate. If you have a suppressed immune system, you should consult your doctor.
Dr. Craig Keathley
Dr. Craig Keathley
Thank
Dr. Larry Lutwick
Internal Medicine - Infectious Disease
In brief: Nothing
The baby is already protected by your circulating antibodies against the virus which has been boosted by getting the zoster. Your baby is protected even if you still had open lesions at the time of delivery.

In brief: Nothing
The baby is already protected by your circulating antibodies against the virus which has been boosted by getting the zoster. Your baby is protected even if you still had open lesions at the time of delivery.
Dr. Larry Lutwick
Dr. Larry Lutwick
Thank
Dr. Bryan Levey
Pediatrics
In brief: Varicella Zoster
Shingles is the reactivated version of chicken pox.
You get chicken pox, you get better, but the virus never leaves you; it stays dormant inside you until it reactivates; and when it does, this is shingles. If you have open sores at the time of delivery, this is a risk to the baby and your obstetrician will take appropriate steps. If there are no open sores, there is nothing to do or take.

In brief: Varicella Zoster
Shingles is the reactivated version of chicken pox.
You get chicken pox, you get better, but the virus never leaves you; it stays dormant inside you until it reactivates; and when it does, this is shingles. If you have open sores at the time of delivery, this is a risk to the baby and your obstetrician will take appropriate steps. If there are no open sores, there is nothing to do or take.
Dr. Bryan Levey
Dr. Bryan Levey
Thank
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