Is acute bronchitis contagious?

Yes. Acute bronchitis is currently considered to be caused mostly by viruses, which are quite contagious. It can be transmitted in the air, by coughing, and by contact with the sick person's hands (if the hands have been coughed on or touched the mouth). The most contagious period is usually early in the illness, and shortly before the illness begins to show symptoms.

Related Questions

Until when is acute bronchitis contagious?

Depends.... There are many different bacteria and viruses that can cause acute bronchitis, each with a different incubation period and shedding time. So, the amount of time a person is contagious depends on which organism is causing the infection. Read more...

How long is acute bronchitis contagious for?

It is not contagious. Acute bronchitis is a reaction to a viral respiratory infection (vri) by suseptible indiviuals, leading to frequent cough, increased mucus production, chest tightness, wheezing. Less than 20% of the population over react to the irritation of a vri with symptoms noted previously. The underlying vri is contagious for 24 hr before the onset of symptoms and for about 5 days after the symptoms begin. Read more...
Days to weeks. Depends on the causative organism, or if the pt has been a chronic smoker then it may be a inherent tendency to have generally inflamed airways without any infection and hence not being contagious. Read more...

When is acute bronchitis contagious and when is it not? Seems physicians some say it is and some say it isn't?

Hard to tell. Some cases are viral & contagious during the early febrile phase but less so as it progresses. Some will represent a mycoplasma germ that is contagious & often affects groups. Most that have a simple bacterial bronchitis do so from normal airway germs that settle in after a virus, these are not contagious.My routine is to consider them contagious until fever free 24h or on med 24h. Read more...

How long is acute bronchitis contagious? I'm over most symptoms except some fatigue and coughing up mucus and blood in the AM. Approx. Day 9

Get examined. You are either relapsing or non-responsive to current therapy. You must be seen, examined, evaluated, diagnosed and treated. Read more...
24 hours no fever. In general, to help avoid the spread of illness it is advisable to avoid close contact with others during the febrile phase until fever free (without medicine) for 24 hours. Now, know that viruses can be transmitted by secretions so STILL be sure to cover mouth when coughing and wash hands often! Read more...

Is my acute bronchitis contageous? For how long?

What is the cause? If its caused by a virus or bacteria.You are contagious until you are under treatment for a bacterial infection.For a viral illness you may be contagious for four to seven days.Acute bronchitis caused by allergy ( asthma) doesn't not carry an allergic component. Read more...

What causes acute bronchitis to develop?

Infection... Acute bronchitis is caused by an infection of the airways; usually bacterial or viral etiology. Read more...

I think I have acute bronchitis--what should I do?

Bronchitis. If you're young and otherwise healthy chances are the bronchitis is viral. Just use over the counter medications to treat a cough if you have it. If you're starting to have high fevers or chills or if you've had bronchitis for more than 10 days you may need antibiotics. . Read more...
Need more info. Nearly all cases of bronchitis are caused by viruses, and antibiotics will not help. But you should not self-diagnose. Everyone should have a primary care doc or nurse practitioner to keep track of your health. Did you have a fever? cough keeping you up? Is it productive? Listening to your chest might change your diagnosis to a walking phneumonia, caused by mycoplasma gondii, which is treatable. Read more...
Acute bronchtis. in non-smokers or non-asthmatics can be self-limited and usually treated with rest and lots of liquid. Signs to watch out for are fever, shortness of breath, severe cough and rapid pulse. Please check with your physician. Read more...