4 doctors weighed in:

Does sleep-sharing increase or reduce the risk of sids?

4 doctors weighed in
Dr. Robert Kwok
Pediatrics
1 doctor agrees

In brief: Yes

A young baby sleeping face-up in a crib without fluffy blankets nor pillows around, without dangerous cords or strings nearby, will be safe there.
His chances getting sids are low (998.5-999 out of 1000 babies won't have sids). Sleeping in a bed with an adult adds the risks of suffocation from blankets & pillows, from trapping the head at the mattress' edge, and from being squashed by the adult.

In brief: Yes

A young baby sleeping face-up in a crib without fluffy blankets nor pillows around, without dangerous cords or strings nearby, will be safe there.
His chances getting sids are low (998.5-999 out of 1000 babies won't have sids). Sleeping in a bed with an adult adds the risks of suffocation from blankets & pillows, from trapping the head at the mattress' edge, and from being squashed by the adult.
Dr. Robert Kwok
Dr. Robert Kwok
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Dr. Natalie Hodge
Pediatrics

In brief: Conflicting research

The research on this issue is conflicting and not clear cut.
We do know that breastfeeding mom's reduce baby's risk of sids; we prefer that mom's co-sleep with baby lying in a co sleeper next to parents. Jim Kemp a pulmonologist at Wash University is one of the foremost researchers on the subject. http://www.cribsforkids.org/2012/07/30/bed-sharing-with-infants-is-linked-to-their-deaths/

In brief: Conflicting research

The research on this issue is conflicting and not clear cut.
We do know that breastfeeding mom's reduce baby's risk of sids; we prefer that mom's co-sleep with baby lying in a co sleeper next to parents. Jim Kemp a pulmonologist at Wash University is one of the foremost researchers on the subject. http://www.cribsforkids.org/2012/07/30/bed-sharing-with-infants-is-linked-to-their-deaths/
Dr. Natalie Hodge
Dr. Natalie Hodge
Thank
Dr. Roy Benaroch
Pediatrics

In brief: Yes

If by sleep-sharing you mean sharing the same bed (often called "co-sleeping"), then the risk of sids is probably increased.
Co-sleeping with the baby next to the bed in a safe, side-car type of thing (sometimes confusingly called a "cosleeper") does not increase or decrease the risk of sids.

In brief: Yes

If by sleep-sharing you mean sharing the same bed (often called "co-sleeping"), then the risk of sids is probably increased.
Co-sleeping with the baby next to the bed in a safe, side-car type of thing (sometimes confusingly called a "cosleeper") does not increase or decrease the risk of sids.
Dr. Roy Benaroch
Dr. Roy Benaroch
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