What are the side effects of radiation for prostate cancer?

Here are some... Radiation intends to kill cancers but always accompanying its collateral injury to all the tissues projected through. As a result, nature or features of all injured tissues may ensue leading to less ability to function and self-repair. Hence, urinary and/or fecal frequency, bleeding from rectum or bladder, etc. may develop. At times, feeling some tiredness may also happen to few. Generally, rare.

Related Questions

Does brachytherapy for prostate cancer have the same side effects as beam radiation?

Yes. Brachytherapy is another form of radiation therapy to treat prostate cancer. The only difference is the manner in which the radiation is delivered. Brachytherapy may cause more urinary symptoms since a higher dose of radiation is delivered in a shorter amount of time. However, the side effects are about the same which include urinary frequency, urinating at night, and some mild urinary discomfort. Read more...
No. Though both types of radiation are delivered to the prostate the brachytherapy has higher levels of radiation that cause more urinary symptoms than external beam. The external beam radiation has greater side effects on the rectum where as a properly performed brachytherapy procedure should have virtually no rectal symptoms. Read more...
Similar. External beam radiation (XRT) has been a treatment for prostate cancer for > 60 years. Brachytherapy or seed implant therapy was devised as a way of trying to reduce the effect of the beam radiation on local tissues such as the bladder and rectum. Both therapies can result in bowel and bladder irritation, though usually not severe. Xrt does have a higher risk for subsequent bladder cancer. Read more...
Proportionate RIsk. I emphasize risk of urinary effects with brachytherapy, but many if not most have none; i emphasize risk of proctitis even 3-4 years later, in fewer than 10%, but this can happen with either method, but commonly does not happen to most. Some patients getting both, have higher risks. But risk does not mean actually getting a problem, but you need to know to be informed. Read more...

How do you choose between surgery and radiation for localized prostate cancer when both have similar success rates and side effects??

Let's discussfurther. The answer to your question is out of scope for this forum. Unfair to answer question in the 400 characters allowed. Treatment is individualized. Happy to review in a consult request. Can review all your particulars. Good luck. Read more...

I've survived prostate cancer for 5 years now after radiation treatment, but with the usual side effects. Is it harmful to masterbate?

No, please enjoy. There is no reason not to masturbate, and healthy to have the urge. Is there any chance you might find or have a partner, that might be better. Read more...
No. No evidence to say yes. Also, we are assuming the cancer is gone. Just do routine psa checks and you should be alright. Read more...

What will my father do with the side effects from his prostate cancer?

Discuss with his Dr. Your father or you should address this to his urologist, oncologist or radiotherapist. There are many sequelae of prostate cancer, such as pain, and urinary syptoms. All can and should be addressed by his drs. Read more...

I have blood in my urine post 6 weeks scope to bladder for prostate cancer side effects, it happened after sex?

Possible, but... Seeing gross hematuria after intercourse under your reported scenario is possible, but bears no alarm as long as voiding comfortably & have no fever. To help undrstand bloody urine in general, view article in http://formefirst.com/hematuria.html. For life reality, view lists of Facts of Life-1,2,&3 by clicking the BUTTON on the left side of HOME of www.formefirst.com. Best... Read more...

I need external beam radiation for prostate cancer, will it have any bad effects on the rest of me?

Radiation proctitis. I can only tell you what i see as a gastroenterologist. Radiation can cause inflammatory changes in the lining of the rectum called radiation proctitis. It can be treated by a gastroenterologist with argon gas therapy if it occurs. Good luck. Read more...
not too bad. The majority of men do very well with radiation. During treatment there can be some fatigue, urinary changes and possibly some loose stools. Late term there can be a risk for erectile dysfunction, small risk for long term urinary changes, and especially with newer radiation techniques a small chance of rectal bleeding (proctitis). Read more...
Outcomes for. Prostate cancer compare quite favorably with surgery: they now have robots; we now have techniques that limit doses to healthy tissues. Proctitis rate is about 3%. Some depends on target, dose, genetic issues. Fatigue is in 1/3; no longer does any one get loose bowels. Erectile dysfunction depends on what you bring: we do not restore magic to wands that do not work. Age, smoking, dm, lipids add. Read more...