4 doctors weighed in:
How long should I let my baby use a pacifier?
4 doctors weighed in

Dr. Lisa Roberts
Pediatrics
1 doctor agrees
In brief: Up to a year of age
The american academy of pediatrics actually endorses the use of a pacifier as it helps to decrease your baby's risk of developing sids (sudden infant death syndrome) in the first year of life.
After 12 months, the benefit does not appear to exist. At that point it is wisest to discontinue the pacifier if not previously done.

In brief: Up to a year of age
The american academy of pediatrics actually endorses the use of a pacifier as it helps to decrease your baby's risk of developing sids (sudden infant death syndrome) in the first year of life.
After 12 months, the benefit does not appear to exist. At that point it is wisest to discontinue the pacifier if not previously done.
Dr. Lisa Roberts
Dr. Lisa Roberts
Thank
Dr. Scott Katz
Pediatrics
In brief: 1 Year
Pacifiers are soothing for most babies , and some studies link their use to decreased sids risk.
However after 1, the benefits are questionable and there is some risk to continued use, including ear infections and teeth problems. The earlier you wean, the easier it is as well.

In brief: 1 Year
Pacifiers are soothing for most babies , and some studies link their use to decreased sids risk.
However after 1, the benefits are questionable and there is some risk to continued use, including ear infections and teeth problems. The earlier you wean, the easier it is as well.
Dr. Scott Katz
Dr. Scott Katz
Thank
Dr. Pamela Lindor
Pediatrics
In brief: It depends..
Pacifiers can be very helpful soothers for some babies.
As they get older, they will learn other ways to soothe themselves and fall asleep. For a baby who is attached to the pacifier as a comfort object, it will be harder to "take it away". You have to decide when you feel that your baby has outgrown the pacifier. If you need help with how to get him/her to stop, ask your doctor for advice.

In brief: It depends..
Pacifiers can be very helpful soothers for some babies.
As they get older, they will learn other ways to soothe themselves and fall asleep. For a baby who is attached to the pacifier as a comfort object, it will be harder to "take it away". You have to decide when you feel that your baby has outgrown the pacifier. If you need help with how to get him/her to stop, ask your doctor for advice.
Dr. Pamela Lindor
Dr. Pamela Lindor
Thank
Get help from a real doctor now
Dr. Jonathan Jassey
Board Certified, Pediatrics
13 years in practice
1M people helped
Continue
107,000 doctors available
Read more answers from doctors