16 doctors weighed in:
How does the dr. Keep you breathing in a wisdom teeth removal operation?
16 doctors weighed in

Dr. David Rosenfeld
Pain Management
6 doctors agree
In brief: Proper sedation
You get medication to make you relax but not induce general anesthesia and thus stop your breathing.
You will be relaxed but breathing on your own.

In brief: Proper sedation
You get medication to make you relax but not induce general anesthesia and thus stop your breathing.
You will be relaxed but breathing on your own.
Dr. David Rosenfeld
Dr. David Rosenfeld
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Dr. David Edsall
Anesthesiology
3 doctors agree
In brief: Three ways
1.Local you are totally awake.
2. Iv sedation with local and nitrous (laughing gas) you should not remember but you are breathing on your own through your nose and mouth. General anesthesia you will have a breathing tube and are unconscious. You may still be breathing on your own dr can breath 4 you. U must do this with an anesthesia person there. Run if surgeon wants his nurse to do the general.

In brief: Three ways
1.Local you are totally awake.
2. Iv sedation with local and nitrous (laughing gas) you should not remember but you are breathing on your own through your nose and mouth. General anesthesia you will have a breathing tube and are unconscious. You may still be breathing on your own dr can breath 4 you. U must do this with an anesthesia person there. Run if surgeon wants his nurse to do the general.
Dr. David Edsall
Dr. David Edsall
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Dr. Kenneth Cheng
Family Medicine
3 doctors agree
In brief: Lite anesthesia
For minor procedures, such as wisdom teeth removal, a doctor (or dentist, in this case) will use a local anesthetic (injected directly at the site) and/or he or she may use "twilight" anesthesia where you are essentially "sleeping" through the procedure.
Through the entire procedure you are breathing on your own.

In brief: Lite anesthesia
For minor procedures, such as wisdom teeth removal, a doctor (or dentist, in this case) will use a local anesthetic (injected directly at the site) and/or he or she may use "twilight" anesthesia where you are essentially "sleeping" through the procedure.
Through the entire procedure you are breathing on your own.
Dr. Kenneth Cheng
Dr. Kenneth Cheng
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Dr. Seth Akst
Anesthesiology
2 doctors agree
In brief: It depends
If you are having your wisdom teeth removed in a dentist's office, you keep breathing on your own even though you may be sedated.
The dentist is in a good position to make certain your airway remains open. In a hospital with an anesthesiologist, you would likely have a breathing tube placed (after you were completely unconscious), and the anesthesiologist would control your breathing.

In brief: It depends
If you are having your wisdom teeth removed in a dentist's office, you keep breathing on your own even though you may be sedated.
The dentist is in a good position to make certain your airway remains open. In a hospital with an anesthesiologist, you would likely have a breathing tube placed (after you were completely unconscious), and the anesthesiologist would control your breathing.
Dr. Seth Akst
Dr. Seth Akst
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Dr. John Stork
Anesthesiology
1 doctor agrees
In brief: Depends
Often wisdom teeth can be removed using local anesthetic and light sedation- you will continue to breathe on your own.
With deeper sedation you still breathe on your own, but should be monitored by someone other than the surgeon. Rarely general anesthesia is needed. Then an endotracheal tube may be inserted into the trachea by an anesthesia provider, and a ventilator may help you breathe.

In brief: Depends
Often wisdom teeth can be removed using local anesthetic and light sedation- you will continue to breathe on your own.
With deeper sedation you still breathe on your own, but should be monitored by someone other than the surgeon. Rarely general anesthesia is needed. Then an endotracheal tube may be inserted into the trachea by an anesthesia provider, and a ventilator may help you breathe.
Dr. John Stork
Dr. John Stork
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Dr. Scott Mackinnon
Anesthesiology
1 doctor agrees
In brief: A few ways
With heavy sedation and local anesthesia, you may be left to breath spontaneously.
Sometimes, under general anesthesia, a tube is placed in the windpipe and the anesthesiologist controls your breathing.

In brief: A few ways
With heavy sedation and local anesthesia, you may be left to breath spontaneously.
Sometimes, under general anesthesia, a tube is placed in the windpipe and the anesthesiologist controls your breathing.
Dr. Scott Mackinnon
Dr. Scott Mackinnon
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