16 doctors weighed in:
Five weeks ago, I was diagnosed with DVT in my left calf.Two weeks ago, I had pain and went to the hospital. Theytold me that the clot is now gone but I am skeptical aboutit. What should I do?
16 doctors weighed in

Dr. Norman Chideckel
Surgery - Vascular
8 doctors agree
In brief: Calf pain
not every calf pain is a dvt though i hear you as you have had a dvt in the past sonogram is quite reliable to determine if dvt is present

In brief: Calf pain
not every calf pain is a dvt though i hear you as you have had a dvt in the past sonogram is quite reliable to determine if dvt is present
Dr. Norman Chideckel
Dr. Norman Chideckel
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Dr. Geoffrey Kuhlman
Family Medicine
3 doctors agree
In brief: Clots clear fast
The body degrades the clot on its own.
The blood thinning medication you take, such as Lovenox or coumadin, (warfarin) simply stops the clot from growing. Clots limited to the calf clear fairly quickly. The larger (longer) the clot, such as those that extend into the thigh or pelvis, the longer it takes to clear.

In brief: Clots clear fast
The body degrades the clot on its own.
The blood thinning medication you take, such as Lovenox or coumadin, (warfarin) simply stops the clot from growing. Clots limited to the calf clear fairly quickly. The larger (longer) the clot, such as those that extend into the thigh or pelvis, the longer it takes to clear.
Dr. Geoffrey Kuhlman
Dr. Geoffrey Kuhlman
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Dr. Ted King
Phlebology
2 doctors agree
In brief: Some clots go quick
As dr. Kuhlman said, some clots can completely recanalize (go away) very quickly, especially if they are calf.
So it is not impossible that your clot might be gone. There is no question though that the location of the clot and the skill of the sonographer makes a huge difference on what is found by an ultrasound scan. Regardless, it is recommended now that you continue anticoagulation.

In brief: Some clots go quick
As dr. Kuhlman said, some clots can completely recanalize (go away) very quickly, especially if they are calf.
So it is not impossible that your clot might be gone. There is no question though that the location of the clot and the skill of the sonographer makes a huge difference on what is found by an ultrasound scan. Regardless, it is recommended now that you continue anticoagulation.
Dr. Ted King
Dr. Ted King
Thank
Dr. Michael Korona
Radiology - Interventional
2 doctors agree
In brief: Ok to question
Dvt can go away on its own.
If symptoms still there you need another scan. Make sure ultrasound lab accredited, which makes sure you get a good study.

In brief: Ok to question
Dvt can go away on its own.
If symptoms still there you need another scan. Make sure ultrasound lab accredited, which makes sure you get a good study.
Dr. Michael Korona
Dr. Michael Korona
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Dr. Gregory Hines
Family Medicine
2 doctors agree
In brief: Treated?
Presuming you were treated with a blood thinner, the clot could have been reabsorbed in that time frame.
Despite that fact, you should keep on the blood thinner until your physician tells you to stop it.

In brief: Treated?
Presuming you were treated with a blood thinner, the clot could have been reabsorbed in that time frame.
Despite that fact, you should keep on the blood thinner until your physician tells you to stop it.
Dr. Gregory Hines
Dr. Gregory Hines
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Dr. Emran Rouf
Internal Medicine
In brief: Pain after DVT
Some patients may develop post-thrombotic syndrome which is leg pain with or without few other symptoms (itching, cramps, swelling) of the affected leg following a DVT.
A negative ultrasound is reassuring.

In brief: Pain after DVT
Some patients may develop post-thrombotic syndrome which is leg pain with or without few other symptoms (itching, cramps, swelling) of the affected leg following a DVT.
A negative ultrasound is reassuring.
Dr. Emran Rouf
Dr. Emran Rouf
Thank
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