Can fertility treatments cause tooth decay? Cavities?

Bacteria and sugar. Decay is caused by bacteria which are naturally occurring in your mouth. When the bacteria are fed sugar, either simple like sweets or complex like bread or sugar, they produce acid which eats into the tooth.
Tooth decay. Sometimes hormonal imbalance can change the ph of your body which in turn can make your mouth more acidic, which can be an environment the bacteria like to thrive in. That can lead to tooth decay. Also you may change the way you eat based on being in treatment, which can be different and possibly change the ph. The lower the ph the more acidic. Bacteria secretes acid to cause decay.
Unsure. Fertility treatments have been linked to increased inflammation of the gums and bleeding of gums, but to date there has been no specific correlation found between fertility medications and cavities. If the treatments cause a decrease in saliva flow, that can contribute to an increased likelihood for cavities. I would advise you see your dentist regularly during and after fertility treatments.
Indirectly. Hormonal changes, medications that may dry the mouth and alter one's oral ecology and probably most relevant .... Lack of attention to routine oral hygiene habits that primarily incorporate daily flossing and secondarily, proper vibratory tooth brushing. (no sweeping, no scrubbing, no brushing in circles just vibrate! these proper habits tend to be overlooked during stressful fertility treatments.
Not directly. Not directly but be aware of changes in dietary habits. Hormone therapy can on the other hand can cause changes in the periodontal tissue similar to pregnancy gingivitis. As you will always hear form a dental professional brushing and flossing along with a regular checkup is your best defense..

Related Questions

Can it be that a few major cavities and tooth decay cause exhaustion.?

It can.... It can if you are experiencing a dental abscess or infection. Remember our dental health is uniquely intertwined with our general health. An infection your mouth will affect your entire body. I would advise getting dental care as soon as possible. Read more...
Possibly. If your body is fighting an infection due to tooth decay, it may be enough to make you tired. You should consult a dentist to get your teeth restored. Read more...
Infection. Cavities can cause infection which affects your entire system-see a good dentist as soon as you can. Read more...

Does diluting juice help prevent baby bottle tooth decay? I understand that juice has sugar, and the sugar can cause cavities. I’ve read that diluting it with water makes it less likely your baby will get baby bottle tooth decay. I only give him juice a f

You . You are correct. Dilution is a good option to reduce sugar intake; brushing at bedtime and avoiding nap and nighttime juice in a bottle will provide additional protection. Ask your dentist when they recommend the first visit. Read more...
Replace don't dilute. The sugar will change the acid/base balance in his mouth while there & for about an hour after drinking the juice. The longer it's in his mouth, the more decay you will see. Consult with your dentist & pediatrician, and determine a way to give him food on intervals and something with no sugar (like water) the rest of the time. This can save you loads of time, $$ and pain. Good luck! Read more...
Not really. Baby bottle tooth decay can be caused by any sugar containing liquid no matter how dilute. It is not how much sugar present that is the problem, but rather how long it stays on the teeth. Only give plain water in the bottle at nap and bed/night time. Babies do not swallow well while sleeping so even diluted juice will be in contact with their teeth for a long enough time to cause cavities. Read more...
Juices in babies. Babies need calories for growth . By diluting the juice you are depriving him of needed calories. The question of whether to give a baby juice is another matter. Juices, on the whole, may be wasted calories. Children need sufficient iron and protein for growth, things that are not supplied by juices. Consult your pediatrician about his feelings. Occasional bottles are acceptable. Read more...
Never. Never, never, never, ever put your child to sleep with a bottle containing anything except water. The sugars in milk, formula, and juice feed the bacteria that cause tooth decay. Please also know that all children should have their first dental examination between the time that their first baby tooth erupts and their first birthday. Consider seeing a Pediatric Dental Specialist. Read more...

Are there any reasons I could suddenly have problems with tooth decay? I'm 38, and had never had a cavity until last year. Since then, at every visit my dentist has found another one. I think I always take pretty good care of my teeth, and don't eat much

It . It is great to hear that you have such a healthy mouth! no cavities until 37.. Not many people can say that. Most probably you had very, very small cavities that were brewing, progressing very slowly, not catching the attention of your dentist. Now, a couple of them have gotten big enough to either show up visibly or on your radiographs. Are you grinding your teeth? You may have worn away some of the enamel, exposing the dentin which is softer and decays more easily. Are the cavities extemely small, or very large? They may be in the pits and fissures of the teeth, which are almost impossible to keep clean and will decay over time. Read more...
Any . Any change in your diet? A big problem today is diet sodas, the acid causes the problem not the sugar. Do you by any chance have dry mouth? Many medications cause this and it leads to decay. Read more...
Spokane, Great . Spokane, great question because it is one that i get often. Because you had never gotten cavities does not mean you are inoculated. The real question is why did you never get cavities till now? In addition to your hygiene and diet, it is usually because of things like Fluoride and sealants that you have avoided this opportunistic disease. I bet you haven't had a Fluoride treatment in a while. And i doubt your sealants are still in tact. So your defenses are down and the opportunity for this disease occurs. No matter how diligent your brushing technique is, you are unable to clean into the deep grooves on (mostly) the chewing surfaces of your teeth. And where ever you can't keep clean, you will eventually get cavities. I'd recommend you start Fluoride treatments every cleaning and switch to a prescription level Fluoride toothpaste. This will not only prevent decay/cavities it may actually reverse them. Hope this is helpful, michael i. Wollock, dmd, agd fellow dentistry at suburban square 610-649-0313 www.Dentistryatsuburbansquare.Com. Read more...
There . There are quite a few reasons that may contribute to an increase in the number of cavities. You may first examine your diet. Besides foods that contain sugar, also consider foods and beverages that are highly acidic. These may also contribute to decay. Another reason may actually be related to your health. Are you taking any new medications? Many medications dry out your mouth and reduce salivary flow. Thus, indirectly increasing the incidence of cavities. You also may have just have deep grooves on the biting surface of your teeth that were prone to eventual cavities. Read more...
How . How long have you been going to this dentist? If you doubt his or her recommendation- get a second opinion. It is not likely that you would be developing a new problem with dental caries, unless something else has changed in your health. Read more...
Humm.. Try a different dentist for a second opinion. Be sure to tell this dentist your concerns and see if your experience is any different. It might be that your teeth have had incipient decay for years in areas (cavities that are too small to treat) and now that you are older are getting larger; or it might be that your dentist is more aggressive in his treatment philosophy than others. Read more...
I got 1st at 34. As we age, our diets change, we move and have new source of water, most without fluoride. Soda is the number 1 cause of tooth decay, in my opinion, along with poor home care. Even with perfect home care, soda will alter your saliva and cause the decalcification of teeth. This will make them much more susceptible to decay. We all need Fluoride to make our teeth more resistant to acid erosion. Read more...

Whats the difference between having tooth decay and a cavity?

Basically same thing. Tooth decay is the tooth/enamel breaking down, and the break point of the tooth is a cavity. Often people refer to their fillings as cavities, saying they have a lot of cavities. But really the teeth have been filled with materials to eliminate the cavity or hole in the tooth. Read more...
Process vs. problem. Tooth decay is a process. It begins with demineralization which then leads to weakening of tooth structure, breakdown and then a cavity. So the cavity, or hole, is the final step in the process. Early stages in the process are sometimes reversible, but when it results in a cavity, then the treatment is a restorative procedure such as a filling. Read more...

I've never had a cavity (or more properly, tooth decay). What should I do?

Regarding what ? If you are asking what you should do if you don't have tooth decay, then i would suggest you continue whatever good habits that you've grown accustomed to so that you can maintain that terrific smile. Read more...
Keep on trucking. Keep doing what you are doing, floss, brush your teeth 3x/day, minimize sweets which lead to teeth decay. Brush before you go to bed. Rinse your mouth after meals. Read more...
Prevention is key. Be sure to brush and floss daily and visit your dentist regularly. Read more...

Would I get tooth decay or cavities if I don't brush my teeth?

Yes. And periodontal (gum) disease as well over time. I wonder what you breath smells like. Read more...
Definitely, yes. Tooth decay and cavities can be avoided if you floss, brush and receive regular dental checkups. Hope it helps. Read more...
Most likely. But then again, people who brush and floss regularly also end up with decay and gum disease, so there's no guarantee either way. Brushing and flossing reduces your chances of developing problems, so why gamble? Read more...
Br/floss be4 bedtime. Tooth decay, cavities are one in the same and are dependant upon many factors. It has been proven that the bacteia that inhabits the mouth mixed with certain foods ( ones high in sugar) does reduce the environment in the mouth to one that is more acidic, beccoming more conducive to decaying the teeth. Read more...

I had 2 cavity fillings, had a minor tooth decay. Now I'm seeing decay in another 2 teeth. Why is it happening so fast and at so small age.

2 issues. 1. there is a need to floss and brush well twice daily to remove plaque. 2. the combination of sugar from processed foods in the presence of acid from soda constitutes a perfect medium for tooth decay. Read more...
Tooth Decay. More info is needed regarding he breakdown of your teeth. Diet? Morphology? Professional hygiene visits? Decay occurs when acid from the bacteria in your mouth demineralize the enamel. Keep your teeth as clean as possible, watch your diet, and see your dentist twice a year to minimize your problem. Read more...
Rampant Decay. High sugar consumption in the form of simple sugars, poor oral hygiene and significant quantities of soda or sweetened beverages or citric acid are common causes of the disease. Good home care, limiting sugars in the diet, sweet sodas, adding fluoride and aggressive dental treatment is the secret of success. Read more...

Why do aboriginals have such great teeth, but Westerners get cavities and tooth decay? Many aboriginals don't even use toothpaste just water.

Fact checking. Not sure where you got your facts from to make such a statement. A google search will give you plenty to read. Here's just one page that disputes your statement: http://www.healthinfonet.ecu.edu.au/other-health-conditions/oral/plain-language/pl-our-review. Read more...
Westerners use sugar. Archaeologists have shown thru the evaluation of Roman remains that they had pretty good dental health. Scientists have also shown that it was the introduction of processed sugar and related products that have created a dental decay epidemic in industrial countries. So the reason is soda, candy, chips, i.e. poor diet choices! Read more...

Do I really need to get my teeth cleaned every six months? I've read that there's not any proof it really helps me avoid cavities or tooth decay.

First . First of all cavities and tooth decay are the same thing. Having said that, if you go twice per year and you do get a cavity it will be caught much earlier and be able to be fixed more afford-ably without needing to do a root canal. What going and having your teeth twice per year really helps is in the prevention of periodontal (gum) disease which is the leading cause of tooth loss. It is now known that patients that have periodontal disease have a much higher risk of some systemic diseases, such as heart disease (approximately 50% increase), stroke, and several forms of cancer. So bottom line, if you have your teeth cleaned twice a year you will probably live longer by preventing those systemic diseases. Read more...
6mo standard minimum. The reasons for your recare (cleaning+exam frequency) are many: 1. Control gum disease (the "silent" tooth killer that is linked with heart disease, diabetes & a growing list of health problems); 2. Screen for oral cancers (there are about 30, 000 cases every year & about 1/3 are fatal often due to late detection); 3. Find cavities early (smaller cavities=simpler+less expensive treatment). Read more...
Yes. Many conditions can be detected and treated before they become unpleasant, time-consuming, costly and potentially dangerous problems. Patients who see their hygienist on a scheduled basis are more likely to have healthier bone and gums and to keep their teeth significantly longer. Poor oral health can affect your ability to properly chew and digest your food, leading to serious nutritional and sy. Read more...
Most likely. The arbitrary twice a year visit was actually started by an old toothpaste commercial! many people need more than two a year, some could get away with less, but twice a year is right for the majority of people. As stated above the cleaning is important to prevent periodontal disease and the exams are needed to detect decay and other pathologies. Only good homecare and diet prevents cavities! Read more...
Sometimes more often. Actually i'm not do sure the proof you read was all that accurate. A professional dental cleaning is essential in removing " biofilm" from your teeth and that is the building block of paler and tarter! every individual based one their own biology builds up biofilm at s different rate. Most people are within normal limits at 6 months, but some would benefit from dental cleanings every 60 days! Read more...