Noise when I talk or swallow -like snapping or ticking from muscles in the vicinity of my ears. It hurts as well. Eustachian tubes are fine I was tested, no TMJ pain when chew/yawn.

Its OK. Crepitus refers to joint noises, such as popping and cracking in the joints as tmj. It can be quite disturbing & cause concern, particularly if it shows up suddenly. In most cases, these noises are not indicative of any underlying problem. Most joint crepitus, cracking and popping usually has a 'bark that is worse than its bite.' there is likely no concern. If any pain arises see a prosthodontist.
Might be TMJ noise. Might be TMJ noise. See TMJ expert for diagnosis. Any dentist can be a TMJ expert with the proper training and experience. Most commonly, oral surgeons, prosthodontists, and orofacial pain specialists. Ask your MD, your dentist and your dental society for referrals.
Crepetus. Could be TMJ problem where the cartilagenous disk in the joint is beginning to break down. Have your dentist check your occlusion. Malocclusion can cause joint damage. Also check w ENT specialist.
TMJoint symptoms. You need to have the muscles around your tm joint evaluated if they are strained or sore that is the problem many times people think they are having ear pain but it turns out to be tmjoint.

Related Questions

Noise when I talk or swallow -like snapping or ticking from muscles in the vicinity of my ears. It hurts as well. Eustachian tubes are fine I was tested, no TMJ pain when chew/yawn.

Jaw noise. It is most likely a dislocation of the disc in your jaw. It is not always painful but TMJ problems have an association to eustation tube dysfunction. If you feel a pop on opening and a clunk on closing then it is most likely a disc displacement. Many TMJ patients complain of fullness in the ears. You may think about seeing a TMJ dentist for evaluation. Read more...
Noise when swallowin. The noise you are hearing may be due to a slight dislocation of the disc in the tmj. The absence of pain is good and this may not become a problem. I would still recommend that you see a dentist that treats tmd to properly diagnosis the problem and determine if the disc location will be a problem in the future. Read more...
Ear noise. May also be spasm of middle ear muscles which can also be triggered by swallowing. Read more...
Cause??? You need to have an evaluation and diagnosis, including x-rays and possibly a mri. The cause of your problem is significant and how long you have been noticing the pop. It may be the articular disk that is displaced forward. Need to have more research. Let a specialist spend time with you, explain and give you options. Read more...
Sounds like tmj. Sounds like TMJ. See TMD expert. Any dentist can be a TMJ expert with the proper training and experience. Most commonly, oral surgeons, prosthodontists, and orofacial pain specialists. Ask your MD, your dentist and your dental society for referrals. Read more...

I have allergy induced ETD. My ears snap and pop when I yawn or swallow. Once my allergies clear how long before my Eustachian tubes normalize?

3 or more. There is no clear timeframe on when your eustschian tube function will fully return after your allergy symptoms have resolved. In general it can take up to 3 months or more for eustschian tube dysfunction to fully return. Depending on your level of discomfort, your otolaryngologist can have you try some medications to try to hasten your recovery . Read more...

The ringing in my ear stops when I swallow can that be TMJ? . Or is it just a problem with Eustachian tube? .

TMJ. TMJ where the head of the mandible exerts pressure on the ear can be a cause of tinnitus. If so, check to see if you open your mouth exactly in midline - draw a vertical line on the mirror. If not perfectly straight, practice relaxing jaw so it opens midline. Practice relaxing your jaw so it opens "straight." See my book, "Stressed? Anxiety? Your Cure is in the Mirror" for more information. Read more...

Can saliva get into your eustachian tubes? It feels like every time I swallow saliva gets in my ears.

See ENT or OFP. Saliva does not ordinarily get into the Eustachian tube because of the way it's anatomically structured and positioned. It's located on the top of the nasopharynx. See ENT to rule out any secondary pathology or Orofacial Pain Specialist to rule out TMJ dysfunction. Hope it helps. Read more...