18 doctors weighed in:

I asked this question last night and never received an answer. Mom just died of complications d/t ms.. My pinky has been numb. Any connection? .

18 doctors weighed in
Dr. Horacio Capote
Psychiatry
5 doctors agree

In brief: Probably Not

Nonetheless, it wouldn't hurt to discuss it with your doctor & get a brief physical evaluation with a neurological exam. I am so sorry for your loss.
You may want to consider grief counseling as well.

In brief: Probably Not

Nonetheless, it wouldn't hurt to discuss it with your doctor & get a brief physical evaluation with a neurological exam. I am so sorry for your loss.
You may want to consider grief counseling as well.
Dr. Horacio Capote
Dr. Horacio Capote
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Dr. Michael Raemisch
Surgery - Hand Surgery
4 doctors agree

In brief: Needs checking

Ms can cause a very very wide variety of symptoms.
It's possible that numb pinky finger could be related to ms, but other causes are much more likely. A very common cause is tightness of the "funny bone" nerve at the elbow. This nerve is called the "ulnar" nerve and the condition is "cubital tunnel syndrome". It's like carpal tunnel of the elbow instead of the wrist.

In brief: Needs checking

Ms can cause a very very wide variety of symptoms.
It's possible that numb pinky finger could be related to ms, but other causes are much more likely. A very common cause is tightness of the "funny bone" nerve at the elbow. This nerve is called the "ulnar" nerve and the condition is "cubital tunnel syndrome". It's like carpal tunnel of the elbow instead of the wrist.
Dr. Michael Raemisch
Dr. Michael Raemisch
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Dr. Todd Sisto
Breast Surgery
2 doctors agree

In brief: See a

Neurologist.

In brief: See a

Neurologist.
Dr. Todd Sisto
Dr. Todd Sisto
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Dr. Jeffrey Junig
Psychiatry
2 doctors agree

In brief: Almost surely no.

There are so many things that can make a pinky numb-- cold, trauma to the ulnar nerve, poor circulation-- it would be very unusual for MS to present that way.
The plaques generally damage wider areas, affecting larger areas- trouble seeing, urinating, walking, talking, swallowing, causing depression... I'm sorry about your mom, and wouldn't worry over the symptom you mention.

In brief: Almost surely no.

There are so many things that can make a pinky numb-- cold, trauma to the ulnar nerve, poor circulation-- it would be very unusual for MS to present that way.
The plaques generally damage wider areas, affecting larger areas- trouble seeing, urinating, walking, talking, swallowing, causing depression... I'm sorry about your mom, and wouldn't worry over the symptom you mention.
Dr. Jeffrey Junig
Dr. Jeffrey Junig
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1 doctor agrees

In brief: Let's analyze

Your Mom's MS would create a statistical risk in you of about 3-4%, but by definition, MS is "multiple", and you describe a solitary problem in one finger. Most likely you have an issue with ulnar nerve at wrist or elbow.

In brief: Let's analyze

Your Mom's MS would create a statistical risk in you of about 3-4%, but by definition, MS is "multiple", and you describe a solitary problem in one finger. Most likely you have an issue with ulnar nerve at wrist or elbow.
Dr. Bennett Machanic
Dr. Bennett Machanic
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In brief: Possible

Unlikely, but possible.
The only way to find of if it really is MS or is a psychological reaction to your mother's death from MS is to see your family physician. A MRI can be diagnostic.

In brief: Possible

Unlikely, but possible.
The only way to find of if it really is MS or is a psychological reaction to your mother's death from MS is to see your family physician. A MRI can be diagnostic.
Dr. William Drescher
Dr. William Drescher
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Dr. K. Olson
Psychiatry

In brief: Finger paresthesia

A transient symptom like this could be to prior trauma to the finger area, cervical disk disease, or resting on your ulnar crease (compression on a nearby nerve feeding that area).
This symptom does not a diagnosis make. If you are concerned about prevention supplement with vitamin d and aggressively tend your health - getting adequate sleep, eating right, managing stress, optimism.

In brief: Finger paresthesia

A transient symptom like this could be to prior trauma to the finger area, cervical disk disease, or resting on your ulnar crease (compression on a nearby nerve feeding that area).
This symptom does not a diagnosis make. If you are concerned about prevention supplement with vitamin d and aggressively tend your health - getting adequate sleep, eating right, managing stress, optimism.
Dr. K. Olson
Dr. K. Olson
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Dr. Bennett Machanic
Board Certified, Neurology
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