21 doctors weighed in:
My 7 month old has full body shakes, it can last up to 5 minutes and is not alert when it happen and is getting worse. Had and EEG and it came out normal?
21 doctors weighed in

Dr. Mark Diamond
Pediatrics
9 doctors agree
In brief: Need Neurology
This story still is suspicious for a seizure.
Perhaps a 24h EEG is indicated and /or a specialist visit. Ask your doctor.

In brief: Need Neurology
This story still is suspicious for a seizure.
Perhaps a 24h EEG is indicated and /or a specialist visit. Ask your doctor.
Dr. Mark Diamond
Dr. Mark Diamond
Thank
2 comments
Dr. James Glauber
A normal EEG does not eliminate the possibility that what you are describing is a seizure.
Dr. James Ferguson
The initial EEG in experienced hands should rule out the most serious & progressive disorders butas Dr.Diamond suggests more eval is needed. A paired video-EEG over many hours should capture events and help sort things out.
Dr. William Goldie
Pediatrics - Neurology
4 doctors agree
In brief: Episodic events
Infants are prone to episodic events.
Most are benign. Some infants reactive to reflux, to constipation, to bladder infections and to other stress. They may hold their breath and shiver or shake. If he is otherwise healthy and growing and developing normally, it is reasonable to just wait. However, a prolonged eeg read by a good pediatric neurologist would be of value.

In brief: Episodic events
Infants are prone to episodic events.
Most are benign. Some infants reactive to reflux, to constipation, to bladder infections and to other stress. They may hold their breath and shiver or shake. If he is otherwise healthy and growing and developing normally, it is reasonable to just wait. However, a prolonged eeg read by a good pediatric neurologist would be of value.
Dr. William Goldie
Dr. William Goldie
Thank
Dr. William Singer
Pediatrics - Neurology
2 doctors agree
In brief: Ambulatory EEG
If the EEG done did not capture an episode of shaking, then ask that a 24 hour eeg be done, or longer, in order to capture an episode of shaking.
This may have to be done several times to capture an episode.

In brief: Ambulatory EEG
If the EEG done did not capture an episode of shaking, then ask that a 24 hour eeg be done, or longer, in order to capture an episode of shaking.
This may have to be done several times to capture an episode.
Dr. William Singer
Dr. William Singer
Thank
2 doctors agree
In brief: Neurology consult
Eegs may be normal in people with seizures, and abnormal is people without seizures.
Was the EEG read by a pediatric or adult neurologist? Some normals in adults are abnormal in peds. Scheule an appointment with a pediatric neurologist, and take a video of the next spell to show the doctor. Good luck.

In brief: Neurology consult
Eegs may be normal in people with seizures, and abnormal is people without seizures.
Was the EEG read by a pediatric or adult neurologist? Some normals in adults are abnormal in peds. Scheule an appointment with a pediatric neurologist, and take a video of the next spell to show the doctor. Good luck.
Dr. Ronda Dennis-Smithart
Dr. Ronda Dennis-Smithart
Thank
Dr. Mohammad Homsi
Neurology
1 doctor agrees
In brief: EPILEPSY
History is very important in diagnosing seizure from other seizure like events, if the event is rhythmic and the infant is not alert so the real seizure is possible, in app.
5o% of cases routine eeg will be normal and then 24 hr eeg with video monitoring is highly recommended to differentiate real seizure from seizure like episode.

In brief: EPILEPSY
History is very important in diagnosing seizure from other seizure like events, if the event is rhythmic and the infant is not alert so the real seizure is possible, in app.
5o% of cases routine eeg will be normal and then 24 hr eeg with video monitoring is highly recommended to differentiate real seizure from seizure like episode.
Dr. Mohammad Homsi
Dr. Mohammad Homsi
Thank
Get help from a real doctor now
Dr. Jonathan Jassey
Board Certified, Pediatrics
13 years in practice
1M people helped
Continue
108,000 doctors available
Read more answers from doctors