Related Questions

Reasons for elevated red blood cell count ?

Below. Your body may increase red blood cell production to compensate for any condition that results in low oxygen levels, including: •Congenital heart disease in adults •Heart failure •A condition present at birth that reduces the oxygen-carrying capacity of red blood cells (hemoglobinopathy) •High altitudes •COPD (chronic obstructive pulmonary disease) and other lung diseasesPulmonary fibrosisSleep apneaNicotine dependence (smoking) Performance-enhancing drugs Certain drugs stimulate the production of red blood cells, including: •Anabolic steroids •Blood doping (transfusion) •Injections of a protein (erythropoietin) that enhances red blood cell production Increased red blood cell concentration •Dehydration (If the liquid component of the blood (plasma) is decreased, as in dehydration, the red blood cell count increases. This is due to the red blood cells becoming more concentrated. The actual number of red blood cells stays the same.) Kidney disease Rarely, in some kidney cancers and sometimes after kidney transplants, the kidneys might produce too much erythropoietin. This enhances red blood cell production. Bone marrow overproduction •Polycythemia vera •Other myeloproliferative disorders. Read more...

Is a elevated red blood cell count in itself something to be concerned with? Thank you

Yes and no. If it is a minor and all CBC is normal then it is ok. If the MCV is low, it could be thalassemia trait. If it is associated with high hemoglobin, it can be abnormal (erythrocytosis or polycythemia). Get checked. Read more...
Not a risk. A high red count with normal hemoglobin and hematocrit (two other tests that check red cells) may be harmless, but should be repeated with a full blood count plus red cell volume. Read more...

I had a spinal tap done and the red blood cell count in CSF was 2000+ marked as elevated. What does this mean? It should be 0 accordinh to sheat

Bloody tap or bleed. Since you're able to type this question coherently, I gather that your health didn't suffer after the lumbar puncture, so that would probably rule out a cerebral bleed (hemorrhage) as a cause of the blood cells in CSF. Most likely the RBCs came from a "bloody tap" - trauma to blood vessels of the back from the needle. Normally, no vessels are damaged, but doctors are not perfect! Hope all is well. Read more...

What might affect the results of a red blood cell count?

Many things. A low rbc count is anemia, and causes include nutritional deficiencies (iron, b12, folic acid), bleeding, chronic illnesses of various kinds, malignancies, and primary bone marrow diseases to name a few. High rbc counts (polycythemia), can occur if there is a lack of oxygen in the blood (lung disease, sleep apnea, smoking for example) or with a blood disorder that causes too many rbcs to be made. Read more...