15 doctors weighed in:

Is it wrong to let my baby fall asleep with the bottle in the crib?

15 doctors weighed in
Dr. Alan Greene
Pediatrics
5 doctors agree

In brief: Yes

Saliva protects a baby's teeth while awake, but disappears while asleep.
If you regularly let your baby fall asleep with a bottle, you are greatly increasing the chances of tooth decay from too much milk sugar coming in contact with the teeth. Consider water (if you've started solids) or a pacifier at bedtime instead.

In brief: Yes

Saliva protects a baby's teeth while awake, but disappears while asleep.
If you regularly let your baby fall asleep with a bottle, you are greatly increasing the chances of tooth decay from too much milk sugar coming in contact with the teeth. Consider water (if you've started solids) or a pacifier at bedtime instead.
Dr. Alan Greene
Dr. Alan Greene
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Dr. Lisa Roberts
Pediatrics
3 doctors agree

In brief: Yes

The habit of feeding with a bottle in the crib is not healthy for your baby's teeth.
It also may increase his or her risk of developing ear infections. Lastly, new research shows that prolonged bottle use at bedtime may increase your baby's risk of obesity later in childhood.

In brief: Yes

The habit of feeding with a bottle in the crib is not healthy for your baby's teeth.
It also may increase his or her risk of developing ear infections. Lastly, new research shows that prolonged bottle use at bedtime may increase your baby's risk of obesity later in childhood.
Dr. Lisa Roberts
Dr. Lisa Roberts
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Dr. Jason Perkel
Pediatrics
3 doctors agree

In brief: No

I wouldn't say that it is "wrong" but it may lead to several problems down the road, such as tooth decay, or sleep onset problems.
If a child learns to fall asleep with the bottle, he or she will need the bottle to fall back to sleep when they awaken in the middle of the night.

In brief: No

I wouldn't say that it is "wrong" but it may lead to several problems down the road, such as tooth decay, or sleep onset problems.
If a child learns to fall asleep with the bottle, he or she will need the bottle to fall back to sleep when they awaken in the middle of the night.
Dr. Jason Perkel
Dr. Jason Perkel
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Dr. Michael Coogan
Pediatrics
2 doctors agree

In brief: It's a mistake

Any sugar-containing liquid in the bottle may do two bad things: increase the risk of tooth decay and increase the risk of lifetime obesity.
I suggest that mothers feed a small amount of plain (not flavored) water just before bed, thus giving a little more cuddling and bonding time. P. S. I once had a patient whose gung-ho mom nursed him until he developed "bottle caries" at age 22 months.

In brief: It's a mistake

Any sugar-containing liquid in the bottle may do two bad things: increase the risk of tooth decay and increase the risk of lifetime obesity.
I suggest that mothers feed a small amount of plain (not flavored) water just before bed, thus giving a little more cuddling and bonding time. P. S. I once had a patient whose gung-ho mom nursed him until he developed "bottle caries" at age 22 months.
Dr. Michael Coogan
Dr. Michael Coogan
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Dr. Robert Kwok
Pediatrics
1 doctor agrees

In brief: Yes

A baby will be more independent if he doesn't associate eating with sleeping.
Otherwise, he might need to eat every time he wakes up at night. After 3 months of age, a normal baby doesn't need to eat at night anymore. At that age, he can be fed, burped, and put down to sleep.

In brief: Yes

A baby will be more independent if he doesn't associate eating with sleeping.
Otherwise, he might need to eat every time he wakes up at night. After 3 months of age, a normal baby doesn't need to eat at night anymore. At that age, he can be fed, burped, and put down to sleep.
Dr. Robert Kwok
Dr. Robert Kwok
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