4 doctors weighed in:

Is motor neurone disease different from locked-in syndrome?

4 doctors weighed in
Dr. Grant Linnell
Radiology
2 doctors agree

In brief: Very different

Locked in syndrome is usually the result of an injury to the brainstem that results in a loss of communication between the brain and the spinal cord.
Motor neuron disease is a progressive degenerative process that affects the nerve cells that carry signals from the brain to the muscles that allow us to move. The most well known example of this is amyotrophic lateral sclerosis.

In brief: Very different

Locked in syndrome is usually the result of an injury to the brainstem that results in a loss of communication between the brain and the spinal cord.
Motor neuron disease is a progressive degenerative process that affects the nerve cells that carry signals from the brain to the muscles that allow us to move. The most well known example of this is amyotrophic lateral sclerosis.
Dr. Grant Linnell
Dr. Grant Linnell
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In brief: Quite a bit

Locked-in syndrome is usually caused by an abrupt stroke affecting the brainstem, but could potentially improve over time.
Motor neuron disease is slowly progressive, and could late in the disorder, cause so much weakness, and disability, that could resemble in effect, the locked in patient.

In brief: Quite a bit

Locked-in syndrome is usually caused by an abrupt stroke affecting the brainstem, but could potentially improve over time.
Motor neuron disease is slowly progressive, and could late in the disorder, cause so much weakness, and disability, that could resemble in effect, the locked in patient.
Dr. Bennett Machanic
Dr. Bennett Machanic
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