13 doctors weighed in:

My ex is addicted to crack cocaine (15yrs). I use no substances. I recently had twins. Could his drug use harm his sperm affecting our kids health?

13 doctors weighed in
Dr. Karl Muench
Clinical Genetics
9 doctors agree

In brief: Highly unlikely

A published study revealed that Cocaine binds to sperm without harming viability or motility.
Definitive evidence of fetal harm from paternal Cocaine exposure is lacking. The good health of your twins is your best guide.

In brief: Highly unlikely

A published study revealed that Cocaine binds to sperm without harming viability or motility.
Definitive evidence of fetal harm from paternal Cocaine exposure is lacking. The good health of your twins is your best guide.
Dr. Karl Muench
Dr. Karl Muench
Thank
Dr. Nikolaos Zacharias
Obstetrics & Gynecology - Maternal Fetal Medicine
1 doctor agrees

In brief: Perhaps.

It certainly cannot help.
I am concerned about the other substance abuse frequently associated with crack Cocaine (alcohol, heroin) and the problems posed by this type of lifestyle that could adversely impact sexual function and health.

In brief: Perhaps.

It certainly cannot help.
I am concerned about the other substance abuse frequently associated with crack Cocaine (alcohol, heroin) and the problems posed by this type of lifestyle that could adversely impact sexual function and health.
Dr. Nikolaos Zacharias
Dr. Nikolaos Zacharias
Thank
Dr. Leonard Lado
Psychiatry
1 doctor agrees

In brief: Sperm and cocaine

There are very few studies to answer this question.
In 1991 dr yazigi and others showed results to support the hypothesis that the sperm may act as a vector to transport Cocaine into an ovum. This novel mechanism could be involved in the abnormal development of offspring of cocaine-exposed males. However the effects post birth are yet to be seen. Abnormal embryos are usually expelled from body.

In brief: Sperm and cocaine

There are very few studies to answer this question.
In 1991 dr yazigi and others showed results to support the hypothesis that the sperm may act as a vector to transport Cocaine into an ovum. This novel mechanism could be involved in the abnormal development of offspring of cocaine-exposed males. However the effects post birth are yet to be seen. Abnormal embryos are usually expelled from body.
Dr. Leonard Lado
Dr. Leonard Lado
Thank
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