Related Questions

Advair upped to 500/50 to better control asthma symptoms. Is there anything I should watch out for at the highest dosage?

Thrush/tachy. you should be sure to rinse out your mouth after ever use to limit the chance of catching thrush from steroids in the mouth. The higher dose could make you a bit more jittery at first but should calm down after a few days. Read more...

Is it possible for 5 out of 6 members in the home to develop allergies and asthma symptoms or could it indicate a mold problem?

Asthma in a family. Asthma can run in families and it is an allergic condition and if you have molds it can trigger episodes of asthma, so if you have molds have them taken care of and see if your asthma and other members improves. Read more...
Possibly... When many people in an environment develop symptoms like this, the environment needs to be evaluated for possible triggers which includes mold. There are other possibilities as well. If the home is evaluated and no problems are found, then the family members need to be evaluated to determine what allergies they have, if any. Read more...

What can relieve my asthma symptoms?

BRONCHIAL ASTHMA. First control the triggers. Then use rx such as the bronshodilators, corticosteroids. Treatments are better explained by your md. Read more...
Inhalers... Asthma treatment includes bronchodilator and steroid inhalers. If there are persistent symptoms after this treatment has been used, then see your doctor for further therapies. Avoid your known triggers. Avoid smoking. Read more...

How much do Laba hide asthma symptoms?

LABA. LABAs do not hide smx. They relive them. However, LABA by it's self is not a usual course for treatment of asthma. See a lung specialist to further address. . Read more...
Use LABA with ICS... Asthma is a condition of intermittent wheeze / breathlessness & triggered by infection, allergy or exercise. SABAs (short acting beta agonists) are used as 'relievers' If you are requiring SABA more than 3 times a week you may need a regular ICS (inhaled corticosteroid) preventer. LABAs (long acting beta agonist) are used in conjunction with ICS to relieve ongoing symptoms despite regular ICS use. Read more...

What are the most common asthma symptoms?

Cough & wheezing. Asthma is a common illness in children that may cause wheezing (a whistling-type sound when the child is breathing, dry tight cough, and labored breathing. In many cases, the cough is worse with exertion (such as when the child is running around/playing) and also at nighttime. It is often brought on by a cold, allergies, sudden change in climate, smoke exposure, or exercise. Read more...
Cough! Far and away, most common symptom is cough. Other symptoms are noisy breathing (wheezing), shortness of breath, chest pain, and abdominal pain. Read more...
Cough, wheezing. Asthma can present with wheezing, cough, shortness of breath, or difficulty running and playing without stopping to catch one's breath. Asthma symptoms usually worsen at night. If cough, wheezing, or shortness of breath awaken your child at night more than twice per month or keep them from running and playing, then make sure to discuss this with your child's doctor. Read more...
Coughing & wheezing. Coughing and wheezing are common symptoms of asthma. Often, a child with asthma symptoms will also breathe faster (take more breaths per minute), and use more chest muscles with stronger efforts to breathe. Wheezing is a sound made when exhaling (breathing out). Symptoms tend to be caused or worsened by colds, flus, exercise, allergies, or rapid changes in the weather. Read more...
Wheezing, SOB. Wheezing, cough, and shortness of breath (sob) are the classic symptoms of asthma. Most often, wheezing and shortness of breath follow the brief period of "cold" symptoms in infants/children. The cough is not so prominent as in bronchitis. Coughing or shortness of breath aggravated by excercise also raises suspicion of undiagnosed asthma. Read more...
Symptoms... Asthma symptoms include acute, recurrent shortness of breath accompanied by coughing and/or wheezing. Other symptoms depend on etiology and severity of the acute exacerbation. Most asthmatics are asymptomatic between episodes. Read more...

My child's asthma symptoms come and go. Why?

Triggers. Some things make asthma symptoms worse. These are called triggers, because they “trigger” symptoms. Common triggers are animal fur, pollen, mold, dust, cigarette smoke. Cold and flu can also trigger asthma symptoms. Staying away from or getting rid of the triggers will help. Read more...
Yes... Asthma, by definition, consists of recurrent episodes of bronchospasm and airway inflammation. These episodes can be triggered by allergies, upper respiratory infections, etc. Between episodes, most patients are entirely normal. Patients should avoid known allergic triggers as much as possible. Patients with acute symptoms like wheezing, cough, shortness of breath need emergent eval, even er. Read more...

Can diet help with asthma symptoms? If so how?

May help. Diets high in vitamin c (may affect inflammation) can be helpful and new evidence shows vitamin d is important for inhaled corticosteroid inhalers to be more effective. While diet can help, it is just a part of management that also includes quick relief medication, avoiding allergens and other triggers, daily controller medication (for persistent asthma), influenza vaccine, smoking cessation. Read more...

What should I do to relieve my asthma symptoms?

Many things. Aside from using your "rescue" inhaler there are a number of things you can do. If your attacks are triggered by allergies, remove as many of them as you can (cover mattresses with barriers for dust mites) if you have carpeting or rugs and are allergic to animal dander, try to remove them especially if they are left over from previous owners or tenants. Other things-talk over with your physician. Read more...