2 doctors weighed in:
What is slapped cheek rash and how do I avoid it?
2 doctors weighed in

Dr. Cornelia Franz
Pediatrics
In brief: Fifth's Disease
Slapped cheek disease is a common virus.
Its latin name is erythema infectiosum. It is caused by parvovirus b19. It is a benign childhood illness and is only a concern to pregnant mothers in the first trimester.It starts with red cheeks like one has been slapped and then spreads downward on the arms, trunk, legs. It looks lacy on the rest of the body. It improves in a few days.

In brief: Fifth's Disease
Slapped cheek disease is a common virus.
Its latin name is erythema infectiosum. It is caused by parvovirus b19. It is a benign childhood illness and is only a concern to pregnant mothers in the first trimester.It starts with red cheeks like one has been slapped and then spreads downward on the arms, trunk, legs. It looks lacy on the rest of the body. It improves in a few days.
Dr. Cornelia Franz
Dr. Cornelia Franz
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Dr. Scott Katz
Pediatrics
In brief: 5th's Disease
Slapped cheek rash means (to a pediatrician) a viral infection known as erythema infectiosum or 5th's disease.
A person who has the rash is generally considered no longer contagious. It is not serious unless you have a condition such as sickle cell disease, or are pregnant and in your first trimester. If you have such a condition and have been exposed, or are seriously ill, notify your physician.

In brief: 5th's Disease
Slapped cheek rash means (to a pediatrician) a viral infection known as erythema infectiosum or 5th's disease.
A person who has the rash is generally considered no longer contagious. It is not serious unless you have a condition such as sickle cell disease, or are pregnant and in your first trimester. If you have such a condition and have been exposed, or are seriously ill, notify your physician.
Dr. Scott Katz
Dr. Scott Katz
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