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How is Parkinson's disease diagnosed?

1 doctor weighed in

In brief: Diagnosis of Parkinson's disease

There is no blood test for Parkinson's disease.
Diagnosis is usually based on symptoms, and by ruling out other conditions that cause similar symptoms. This can often be done with an X-ray examination called computerised tomography (a CT scan), which is useful in detecting diseases that affect large areas of the brain. Then, if symptoms are reduced by treatments given for Parkinson's disease, its fairly certain that the person has Parkinson's disease.


Symptoms similar to Parkinson's disease can be a side-effect of some medications, such as anti-sickness drugs and drugs used in the treatment of mental illness. If this is the case, changing the medication should reduce symptoms.

In brief: Diagnosis of Parkinson's disease

There is no blood test for Parkinson's disease.
Diagnosis is usually based on symptoms, and by ruling out other conditions that cause similar symptoms. This can often be done with an X-ray examination called computerised tomography (a CT scan), which is useful in detecting diseases that affect large areas of the brain. Then, if symptoms are reduced by treatments given for Parkinson's disease, its fairly certain that the person has Parkinson's disease.


Symptoms similar to Parkinson's disease can be a side-effect of some medications, such as anti-sickness drugs and drugs used in the treatment of mental illness. If this is the case, changing the medication should reduce symptoms.
Quality HealthCare Team
Quality HealthCare Team
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