What is psoriasis?

Psoriasis. Your skin is made up of several layers, the top one of which constantly sheds old cells and replaces them with new ones from underneath. This happens in a cycle that usually takes about 28 days. If you have psoriasis, the rate at which your skin is replaced in the affected area increases and the cycle can be as short as two to six days. New skin cells move to the surface before they have properly matured and build up on your skin in thick patches called plaques. There is also a build-up of a type of blood cell (called T-cells) under your skin, which causes inflammation.


Psoriasis is a life-long condition and it’s unlikely that you will ever be completely free of it. However, it tends to fluctuate in severity over time, often for no apparent reason. This means that you may have flare-ups when the symptoms are more severe, but at other times the condition may hardly be noticeable.


Psoriasis isn't contagious, so you can't catch it from other people and it doesn't spread from one part of your body to another.
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Related Questions

What is psoriasis?

Chronic patches. Psoriasis is a condition caused by the too-rapid growth of skin cells. As new cells come to the surface in a matter of days rather than weeks, buildup occurs. Psoriasis can cause extreme redness, itching, and burning. Doctors assist patients in managing skin health through diet and lifestyle habits as well as prescription medication as needed. Learn more at http://dermdocs.com/. Read more...

What causes psoriasis?

Inherited. Psoriasis is an inherited inflammatory condition that waxes and wanes. Treatment is generally directed towards control of symptomatic flares. Although no cure, there are many treatment options to help you stay reasonably clear. These include topical steroids, vitamin d derivatives, oral medications, phototherapy and biologics. Your doctor will recommend treatment based on the extent of disease. Read more...
Psoriasis. Psoriasis seems to be passed down through families. Doctors think it may be an autoimmune condition. This occurs when the immune system mistakenly attacks and destroys healthy body tissue. http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmedhealth/pmh0001470/. Read more...

What does psoriasis look like?

Psoriasis. Psoriasis causes areas of dry, red, flaky skin called psoriatic plaques. These lesions can be found on many parts of the body, including the face, hairline, and scalp. Plaques are itchy and can be painful. Nearly 90% of people with psoriasis have plaque psoriasis. Read more...
Photograph. This is a photograph of a particularly narly case: http://www.Bing.Com/images/search?Q=psoriasis&qs=as&sk=&form=qbir&pq=psoarisis&sc=8-9&sp=1&qs=as&sk=#view=detail&id=916de30135a0b55e7ebcedb752534b460a32697d&selectedindex=1. Read more...

What does psoriasis usually look like?

Flaky red plaques. Flaky/scaly red (erythematous) thich plaques, from few mm to several CM in size. Read more...
Psoriasis . There are different types of psoriasis: plaque, guttate, pustular, erythrodermic and inverse. Attached is one of many excellent links to learn more about each type and what they will look like. https://www.psoriasis.org/about-psoriasis. Read more...

What does psoriasis look like show images?

See AAD.org. Psoriasis is usually silvery plaques on knees, elbows, scalp on red base. You can see images at aad.Org or psoriasis foundation.Org. The latter is a self help group with excellent information. When you choose treatment your dermatologistccan discuss treatment options. Read more...
See below. https://www.bing.com/images/search?q=psoriasis+pictures&FORM=HDRSC2
Visit the site above for images of psoriasis. Read more...

What is psoriasis? Or rather what can be done to stop psoriasis getting worse and to basically be able to cure it or stop in coming on and affecting

Psoriasis. Psoriasis is an autoimmune disease where our immune system creates problems with our skin and joints. Psoriasis is diagnosed by your physician, and there are many types of this disease such as plaque psoriasis. Disease Modifying Antirheumatic Drugs and Biologic medications (eg. monoclonal antibodies against TNF-alpha, a cytokine), are also used to slow disease progression and treat symptoms. Read more...
Psoriasis. Psoriasis is a chronic disorder, ie it often persists and there isn't a cure. In some people it settles by itself. In others, treatment choices need to be individualised by a dermatologist. Masses of information at www.dermnetnz.org/topics/psoriasis. Read more...
Psoriasis. It is an autoimmune inflammatory disease. occurs in genetically susceptible individuals and presents with development of inflammatory plaques on the skin. Treatment would include - education to the patient- can be frustrating for the patient and the doctor - therapy- topical or systemic mild/ moderate-- topical steroids/emmoliants. alternative- vit d analogues -severe- phototherapy/immunosuppres. Read more...

What is psoriasis? Does it cause dandruff?

See details. Psoriasis is an autoimmune disease that causes red, scaly plaques in the skin. If if involves the scalp, it can cause flaking that can look like dandruff. Read more...

What makes psoriasis spread and why do I have cronic itching with it?

Psoriasis can itch. There are many things that can make psoriasis spread and flare. Stress, smoking, alcohol, some medications, scratching, some infections (strep throat). Psoriasis can also be very itchy. If you are not seeing a dermatologist for your psoriasis, you should be. They can be very helpful in managing this difficult chronic disease. Remember, psoriasis has no cure. Bummer, i know. Read more...

If sebbhoric dermatitis causes dry scalp then what is psoriasis? Whats the difference between both? Dry+oily scalp? What is it? Pls tell

Different. Seborrhea usually occurs in oily skin and scalp and thought to be an unusual response to a fungus found on the skin in 85% of all adults. Psoriasis is considered an autoimmune disease which is a little more difficult to treat. Whereas seborrhea occurs mostly on the scalp and face, psoriasis tends to be more concentrated on the extremities but the scalp can be affected as well. Read more...