What is skin cancer?

Skin cancer. An abnormal or uncontrolled growth of the cells of the skin can be benign or malignant. If it's malignant, it's called skin cancer. A malignant growth can invade neighbouring tissues or spread to distant organs in the body (metastasis).

Related Questions

What is skin cancer?

Cancer of skin cells. Skin cancer is cancer that occurs in the various types of cells that make up the skin. For example, squamous cancer is cancer that occurs in the surface cells/squamous cells while melanoma is cancer in the melanocytes or pigment cells responsible for our skin color. Basal cell carcinoma is cancer in the cells of the basal layer. These are the major types but they're many others. Best of luck. Read more...
A serious condition. When the skin undergoes abnormal growth, most types do to sun or uv light exposure. You need to have this evaluated even if it appears non significant. Read more...
Lets be more specifi. That is a big and wide open question. The simple answer is that it is a cancer arising from your skin. Commonly skin cancer can be one of 3 types: basal cell carcinoma squamous cell carcinoma melanoma. If you have any concern that you may have any of the above, you should get a medical examination done to confirm it. Read more...
Info. Examine all lesions for the abcde's of skin cancer: a(asymmetry) one half is not like the other half), b(border) irregular, poorly defined or scalloped border, c(color) multiple colors of tan, brown, dark black, red, white, or blue, d(diameter) greater than 6mm or a pencil eraser, e(evolving) changing in size, shape, or color, or bleeding. Read more...
Abnormal cells. Skin cancer has become a concerning condition which affects approximately one in every five people today. There are several types of skin cancer, each of which is the result of abnormal cellular activity. Common forms of skin cancer are basal and squamous cell carcinomas and melanoma. Early treatment is ideal for optimal prognosis. Learn more about skin cancer at http://dermdocs.com/. Read more...

What causes skin cancer?

Sun damage, Genetics. There can be a family component to many cancers including skin cancers. This should not be taken lightly. Sun exposure is another large risk factor for skin cancer. The two together can be very dangerous. If you have a strong family history, lots of sun exposure, or any enlarging skin lesions, be evaluated by your local doctor and/or dermatologist. Read more...
Sun. Especially in the 1st 16 years of your life when people tend to sun tan the most. Other risk factors include hpv, fair skin family history of skin cancer. Read more...

What does skin cancer look like?

Can vary. Skin cancers come in many types and forms. Three important types include melanoma, squamous cell carcinoma, & basal cell carcinoma. Dermatologist are trained to identify theses cancers by clinical examination, but definitive diagnosis for all suspicious lesions remains a skin biopsy, so that it can be checked under the microscope. I highly recommend www.Skincancer.Org for photos and detailed info. Read more...
Varies. There are several different types of skin cancers. Squamous cell the skin begins as a small nodule and as it enlarges the center becomes necrotic and sloughs and the nodule turns into an ulcer. Basal cell patients present with a shiny, pearly nodule. Melanoma patients have an irregularly appearing pigmented lesion. Read more...

What does skin cancer look like?

Raised surface. The appearance of skin cancers can vary depending on the type of cancer.Melanomas can be darkly pigmented. There may be irregular margins. The edges may be raised. Sorrounding area may feel hard to touch. Sometimes there may be bleeding from the growth. Read more...
ABCD. Just remember the abc's. A- asymmetric or irregular b- bleeds c- color changes d- diameter or size enlargement. Read more...

What might skin cancer look like?

New lumps or bumps. Any new skin bump which is new, enlarging, and changing is concerning. The older you are, and the more sun exposure you have had, the higher the risk of skin cancer. Melanomas risk is remembered as abcd: asymmetry, irregular borders, irregular coloration, diameter >6mm. If in doubt, have a doctor look at it. Read more...
Many types . Depends on the type of skin cancer: basal cell, squamous cell, melanoma, dermatofibrisarcoma, etc. They may look like a pimple, mole, ulcer, scar, nodule, plaque, rash, pigmented, colored, etc. Appearance as well as behavior and history and location are important pieces of information that contribute to the assessment. Read more...
Growing sore. Skin cancer often begins as a small bump that looks like a “pimple that doesn’t go away”. It gradually enlarges, and sometimes bleeds. The cancer may appear red, pearly, scaly, flesh-colored, or darker than the surrounding skin. If you have a growing spot that doesn't heal, you should see your dermatologist. Read more...
Varies. There are several different types of skin cancers. Squamous cell the skin begins as a small nodule and as it enlarges the center becomes necrotic and sloughs and the nodule turns into an ulcer. Basal cell patients present with a shiny, pearly nodule. Melanoma patients have an irregularly appearing pigmented lesion. Read more...

What makes skin cancer so dangerous among other cancers?

Skin cancer. Skin cancer, especially malignant melanoma, has the potential to spread to distant areas of the body apart from the skin ( lymph nodes, brain, etc.) if the melanoma is not detected in a timely fashion. Read more...

What does skin cancer look like? How can you tell if you have it?

ABCDE for Melanoma. "abcde" is the easy mnemonic for melanoma (the worst kind): a = asymmetry - one half is different from the other half. B = border irregularity - the edges are uneven. C = color - the color is uneven, with shades of tan, brown and black. D = diameter - the diameter is greater than 6 mm. E = evolution - rapidly changing. Basal and squamous cell carcinomas should be addressed separately. No room. Read more...
ABCD's. Remember your abcd's when thinking of melanoma. Look for moles with asymmetry boarders that are irregular color differences within the same mole diameter greater than 6mm also any new mole or old that starts to itch, bleed or ulcerate should be of concern. Another rule is the ugly duckling rule. Which refers to a mole that looks distantly different from the others on your body. Read more...

What makes skin cancer deadly?

Depends on the kind. Melanoma is the kind of skin cancer that usually leads to death. It can spread to vital organs in a fairly aggressive fashion, thus the importance of preventing it by avoiding UV light exposure or at least early detection with regular skin screenings. Other types of skin cancers can kill if neglected but that is uncommon. Read more...
When it spreads. Skin cancer can be deadly when it spreads to other organs, especially the brain, lungs, and liver. Fortunately, there are usually clear signs and good treatments for skin cancer before it gets this advanced. Read more...

What causes skin cancer cells to go from normal to a cancer?

Malignant mutation. . A genetic event that alters the normal cell cycle of a skin cell can transform it into a malignancy. Inherited faults of dna repair, along with tissue damage such as from inflammation or solar radiation can cause cells to make this transformation. Read more...
Ultraviolet light. While there is a new study implicating cigarette smoking as a contributing factor, most research points to ultraviolet light (sunshine, tanning bed, welding torch rays) as the most common trigger. More rarely, long term exposure to certain chemicals can also cause this in factory or farm workers whose skin is constantly exposed. A weakened immune system can aid the transformation. Read more...