​What are the treatments for plantar fasciitis?

Treatment of plantar fasciitis. People with plantar fasciitis are often treated and recovered with very basic approaches, for example, some simple self-help approaches, medications and physiotherapy.

Self help
• Rest your foot as much as possible
• Stretch your calf muscles and the plantar fascia
• Apply ice pad to the injured area until the swelling goes down
Massage your foot by rolling a golf ball on the sole
• Wear good quality and well-fitted shoes or insoles
• Ignoring the pain may take you longer to heal.
• Try a low-impact sport, such as swimming or bicycling, instead of walking or jogging.

Medications
Pain relievers such as ibuprofen may help to ease your pain and inflammation in your feet. Steroid shots may be used to the tender area, which provides temporary pain relief. However, it produces side-effects such as weakening of plantar fascia for prolonged use.

Physiotherapy
Stretching and strengthening exercises tailored specifically to you by a physiotherapist will ease your condition. Your physiotherapist will provide an exercise program to stretch your plantar fascia and Achilles tendon, and to strengthen your lower leg muscles, aiming to stabilize your ankle and heel. Sometimes, an athletic taping may be used to support the bottom of your feet. Wearing a splint at night to stretch your calf and the arch of your foot will be recommended. This holds the plantar fascia in a lengthened position overnight for stretching.

Extracorporeal shock wave therapy
It is a therapy using sound waves at the infected area to promote healing. It is often used for plantar fasciitis that has no response to conservative treatments. However, it may cause swelling and pain that has not been shown very effective.
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Surgical management
Your doctor may recommend a surgery based on your situation if all the conservative treatments do not work. Some people may need a surgery to detach the plantar fascia from the heel bone. However, it may cause side effects such as weakening of your foot arch.
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Related Questions

Is there a treatment for plantar fasciitis?

Conservative options. Plantar fasciitis can be treated conservatively with stretching exercises, anti inflammatory medications, ice applications, physical therapy and orthotics/inserts. Steroid injections may be administered for moderate to severe cases. A majority of cases resolve within a few months of treatment. Cases that don't resolve may be treated surgically. Read more...
Combo treatment. . The more you can do together, the better: #1: supportive shoes. #2: firm inserts or orthotics. #3: oral antiinflammatories (check with your doctor for dosing). #4: stretching your foot and calf. #5: icing (10 min at a time). You may also need physical therapy or cortisone injections, or eswt if available in your area. Very few people go on to surgery, but it is a possible treatment. Read more...

What is the treatment for plantar fasciitis?

Several options . Treatment ranges from shoe supports to oral NSAID drugs (like ibuprofen) to steroid injections to surgery. Read more...
Plantar fascitis. Most common cause of heel pain is from plantar fasciitis, a pull/sprain of the plantar fascia from where it attaches to the heel bone on the btm of the foot. Txs include rigid arch support to decrease the pull of the fascia, combined with antiinflammatory medication (oral and/or injectable) to reduce the inflammation. A partial release may be done surgically in chronic cases that dont respond. Read more...
Combo treatment. . The more you can do together, the better: #1: supportive shoes. #2: firm inserts or orthotics. #3: oral antiinflammatories (check with your doctor for dosing). #4: stretching your foot and calf. #5: icing (10 min at a time). You may also need physical therapy or cortisone injections, or eswt if available in your area. Very few people go on to surgery, but it is a possible treatment. Read more...
Anything that works. for you. PF is a difficult disease to treat and tends to be recurrent. Some patients respond with minimal treatment and most spontaneously improve or worsen no matter what we do. It is my opinion that most current therapies are not helpful, and stretching and icing makes no sense at all. Healing needs good circulation and some pain relief with rest, and focal massage therapy helps. Read more...

What are the treatment options for plantar fasciitis?

Many treatments. Treatments for plantar fasciitis include (from conservative to more aggressive): stretching (in the am before any weight bearing), massage or physical therapy, arch supporting insoles, anti-inflammatory medications, night splints, cortisone injection, and surgery. See your family doctor, orthopedic surgeon or podiatrist for your specific treatment. Read more...
Plantar fasciitis. There are a range of treatment options and all should incorporate a good stretching regimen. Treatment recommended may also include physical therapy, orthotics, injections and rarely surgery. For more information, visit: http://www.Foothealthfacts.Org/footankleinfo/heel-pain.Htm. Read more...
There are many. Some include, orthotics or arch supports, radial wave or shock wave treatments. Achilles tendon stretches, rolling your foot over a frozen water bottle, antiinflammatories, sometimes injections may help. If you try some of these and still have pain see a podiatrist or orthopod. Read more...
Combo treatment. . The more you can do together, the better: #1: supportive shoes. #2: firm inserts or orthotics. #3: oral antiinflammatories (check with your doctor for dosing). #4: stretching your foot and calf. #5: icing (10 min at a time). You may also need physical therapy or cortisone injections, or eswt if available in your area. Very few people go on to surgery, but it is a possible treatment. Read more...
Plantar fascitis. Most common cause of heel pain is from plantar fasciitis, a pull/sprain of the plantar fascia from where it attaches to the heel bone on the btm of the foot. Txs include rigid arch support to decrease the pull of the fascia, combined with antiinflammatory medication (oral and/or injectable) to reduce the inflammation. A partial release may be done surgically in chronic cases that dont respond. Read more...
Hot or cold. From the moment your fascia became injured, your body began to go into a healing mode. All the time that you are continuing to do your normal activity, you are increasing the demand on the tissue to heal. Eventually the healing can't keep up and now you have pain. You must close the gap between damage and healing. Stretching the tissue and applying ice is one way to go. Heat, elevation the other. Read more...
Treatment. http://www.aidmyplantar.com/plantar-fasciitis/plantar-fasciitis-surgery-rehabilitation.php. Read more...

What was the treatment of plantar fasciitis in the 1800s?

None. Unlikely that plantar fasciitis was specifically diagnosed and treated as such in the 1800's. Read more...
Unknown . Plantar fasciitis was likely not a recognized entity at that time. It is likely that with poor footwear and hard labor that many people suffered from what we now call plantar fasciitis. I don't have any information on the treatments at that time. Read more...
No way to know. This diagnosis was not documented at that time. One possibility is that before the advent of cushioned shoes, people had stronger intrinsic foot muscles, making this condition less prevalent. It is also possible that there were other more debilitating problems that took precedent. Read more...
No way to know. This diagnosis was not documented at that time. One possibility is that before the advent of cushioned shoes, people had stronger intrinsic foot muscles, making this condition less prevalent. It is also possible that there were other more debilitating problems that took precedent. Read more...

What to if I am having plantar fasciitis for last 1 year and want proper treatment?

See an orthopedist. Some recommend a podiatrist but i personally prefer an orthopedist for this problem. Read more...
Combo treatment. . If you have plantar fasciitis, and hurt most with the first few steps in the morning, the more you can do together, the better: #1: supportive shoes. #2: firm inserts or orthotics. #3: oral antiinflammatories (check with your doctor). #4: stretching your foot and calf. #5: icing (10 min at a time). You may also need physical therapy or cortisone injections, or eswt if available in your area. Read more...

I'm having shock wave treatment for plantar fasciitis had two lots still in pain when will I feel a differance?

Should havr. If you've had two rounds of shockwave therapy, without results, move on. There are a lot of options for plantar fasciitis. Nothing works all the time. If your looking for immediate relief, see your local area podiatrist for a cortizone (hydrocortisone) injection. This 15 second injection, may offer you months of relief. Stop living in pain. Read more...
Plantar fasciitis. I do not feel shock wave therapy is effective in treating plantar fasciitis. Please get a second opinion. Read more...
3 months. Using high frequency shockwave, you should have had results within 3 months of treatment. If still a problem, and i assume you have had 6 months of conservative therapy ( injections, night splints, orthotics etc), there is still the surgical option, which may be necessary for relief. Read more...

What are the diagnostic tests for plantar fasciitis? What is the treatment?

There are no. "tests" the diagnosis is usually made "clinically" (Symptoms/location etc) If there is a question MRI imaging may be useful. The treatment is anti-inflammatory medication(s) and ORTHOTICS (special shoes designed to take the weight away from the inflammed area(s) A PODIATRIST may be helpful! Hope this helps! Dr Z. Read more...