How is plantar fasciitis diagnosed?

Diagnosis of plantar fasciitis. Usually physical examination and medical history are good enough to make a diagnosis. Your doctor will check your feet when you stand and walk, and also the points of tenderness in your feet, aiming to find out the location of your pain and its cause. He or she may ask the following questions:
• Your medical history, such as illnesses or injuries you had
• Your presentation of symptoms, such as where the pain is, and what time of the day it hurts most
• The activities that you are engaged in

Imaging tests such as x-ray or magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) test is often done to exclude other medical possibilities, such as stress fracture or a pinched nerve. An x-ray can even show a bone spur, which may cause heel pain and should be removed by surgery. .

Related Questions

What can I do about plantar fasciitis?

Arch supports ,shoes. Most people with common heel pain get relief of their symptoms with stretching of the calf muscles and better support of the arches. This can be with better shoes, or arch supports. Functional orthosis are the best but are expensive. I recommend trying over the counter firm supports first and if your symptoms are not better seek a podiatrist consult. Read more...
NEED FOR SUPPORT! Most shoes aren't that bad, usually it's the crummy insoles they come with! there are many possibe reasons (plantar fascitis leaps to mind) that you may have pain in the heels, but try arch supports like spenco polysorb (http://www.Spenco.Com/products/footcare/poly-sorb) and otc anti-inflammatories (like aleve). If these don't help, see a podiatrist. Read more...
A few things. Make sure your shoes have good cushion and support and are not excessively worn. If so, replace them. You might want to try over-the-counter arch supports. Doing runners stretches consistently can be a big help. You can also try over-the-counter antiinflammatories. If not improved, see a podiatrist who can offer prescribed medicine, physical therapy, injections, foot orthoses. Surgery is rare. Read more...
Combo treatment. . The more you can do together, the better: #1: supportive shoes. #2: firm inserts or orthotics. #3: oral antiinflammatories (check with your doctor). #4: stretching your foot and calf. #5: icing (10 min at a time). You may also need physical therapy or cortisone injections, or eswt if available in your area. Read more...

What can to if I have plantar fasciitis?

Combo treatment. . If you have plantar fasciitis, and hurt most with the first few steps in the morning, the more you can do together, the better: #1: supportive shoes. #2: firm inserts or orthotics. #3: oral antiinflammatories (check with your doctor). #4: stretching your foot and calf. #5: icing (10 min at a time). You may also need physical therapy or cortisone injections, or eswt if available in your area. Read more...
See below. Initially try ice for 20 min twice daily, stretch, consider an orthotic and try an otc anti-inflammatory such as aleve (naproxen). Read more...
RICE. Rest, ice, compression and elevation. May need mild steroid injection and stretching the correct way. Nsaid will help and consider custom orthotics. Last resort is surgery. Read more...