What is Zika Virus Infection?

Disease. Zika virus infection is a mosquito-borne disease caused by Zika virus.

Related Questions

Does being infected with the Zika virus once brings immunity from future infections? If infected again, will a person still be able to infect others?

Not yet known. To my knowledge, we don't yet have answers to these questions. Some mosquito borne viral infections confer lifelong immunity to reinfection, e.g. yellow fever. Others do not, e.g. dengue. In fact second episodes of dengue often are more serious than the first. Research is underway on Zika; keep your antennae up for new information. Excellent info available from CDC: http://www.cdc.gov. Read more...
Confers immunity. According to the CDC, once a person has been infected with Zika, that person is likely to be protected from future Zika infections. As more research is underway, we are likely to have a broader understanding in the near future. For more information, visit http://www.cdc.gov/zika/. Read more...

What are the symptoms of zika virus?

About Zika... It can be hard to tell if a person has Zika, because the symptoms of Zika are not unique to Zika. About 1 in 5 infected people get symptoms of Zika, such as fever, rash, joint pain, conjunctivitis (red eye), muscle aches, headache. About 4 of 5 infected people do not get noticeable symptoms. More research and knowledge will come in 2016 and beyond. Zika is also sexually transmitted between humans. Read more...

In which countries in the Americas do I have to worry about Zika virus from mosquito bites?

CDC website. Comprehensive, reliable information is available from the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention: http://www.cdc.gov/zika/index.html/ Read more...
22 countries: As of Jan 27, 2016, these countries have Zika virus transmission in the Americas: Barbados Bolivia Brazil Colombia Dominican Republic Ecuador El Salvador French Guiana Guadeloupe Guatemala Guyana Haiti Honduras Martinique Mexico Panama Paraguay Puerto Rico Saint Martin Suriname U.S. Virgin Islands Venezuela. Read more...
CDC website. Visit the Center for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) website for a complete updated list of countries to which to avoid travel. http://www.cdc.gov/zika/ Read more...
So far in 2015... Zika transmission areas in North and Central America in 2015: El Salvador, Guatemala, Honduras, and Panama in Central America; plus in Mexico. Zika in South America and the Caribbean: Bolivia, Brazil, Colombia, Ecuador, French Guiana, Guyana, Paraguay, Suriname, and Venezuela; plus Barbados, Guadeloupe, Haiti, Martinique, Puerto Rico, and Saint Martin. Read more...
In 2017--- Belize, Costa Rica, El Salvador, Guatemala, Honduras, Nicaragua, Panama, Mexico, Argentina, Bolivia, Brazil, Colombia, Ecuador, French Guiana, Guyana, Paraguay, Peru, Suriname, Venezuela. This does not include the Caribbean. See: https://wwwnc.cdc.gov/travel/page/zika-travel-information. Read more...

My baby is 1mo and we're in Brazil. I'm concerned about the Zika virus. Witch repellent should I use?

Not deet. DEET isnt recommended before 2 months. There are many formulas based on natural products that may be helpful. Use mostly on clothing rather than the infant. I haven't found any reliable source that Zika is dangerous to infants. The known damage is teratogenic..meaning it happens before birth. Read more...

How do you prevent catching the Zika virus?

Travel, mosquitoes. Avoid travel to those parts of South America where infection is common. If necessary to travel there, very careful mosquito bite prevention: long sleeves and pants, preferably with clothing that has embedded mosquito repellents (available at outoor equipment and travel stores); plus compulsive use of effective insect repellents (active ingredient DEET or picaridin). As yet no worries in the US. Read more...
Avoid certain areas. Most importantly, avoid travel to areas designated by the CDC as high risk. You can find an updated list on the CDC website. If travel to one of these areas cannot be avoided, make sure to apply insect repellant frequently and to wear long sleeves and pants. Make sure all windows and doors have screens if they are to remain open. Get rid of standing water as this is where mosquitos breed. Read more...
Stop mosquitoes. By avoiding mosquito bites. A person can use bug repellents containing DEET, picaridin, IR3535, or synthetic oil of lemon eucalyptus. Bring repellent from home, due to a short supply in outbreak areas. Read more...

I am traveling to Anguilla in he British West Indies next week. Has the Zika virus been a problem there? What are the risks for a 60 year old couple?

Anguilla. The US State Department warns that mosquito-borne illnesses such as Dengue and Chikungunya occur in Anguilla. They recommend you use CDC approved mosquito repellant (see link). There is only one major hospital on Anguilla. Make sure you purchase international travel insurance. Have a great time. Visit the US State Department. http://travel.state.gov/content/passports/en/country/anguilla.html. Read more...
Visit CDC.gov. For the latest list of high risk areas, visit CDC.gov. The risks for a non-pregnant individual is to manifest a mild illness with symptoms such as fever, rash, joint and bone aches. It is however important to protect yourself during travel to prevent infection and the potential to infect others. Read more...

How do doctors test for Zika Virus?

We ask Questions 1st. Doctor's determine Zika Virus by first determining clinic symptoms. Meaning if a patient has symptoms like fevers, rashes, muscle pains or red eyes. Then we think of the possiblility of Zika and ask questions about travel history like to Brazil and make sure it is not something else like dengue. Then we test the blood for presence of Zika Virus which is done through the CDC. Read more...
Blood test. The Zika virus is verified by a blood test that is currently only being processed at the CDC Diagnostic Laboratory and a few state health departments. Test results are usually available between 4-14 days after the lab receives the specimen. For more information, visit http://www.cdc.gov/zika/. Read more...
Usually blood tests. Testing is available at a limited number of labs (2015-2016) so far, and includes PCR testing of blood for the virus itself, and antibody testing to look for the patient's immune system response to infection. Read more...

Is it ok to take a family cruise to the Eastern Caribbean with the zika virus outbreak? My children are 7 and 10.

ZIKA AND RISK. Travelling to Zika virus infested areas is of importance if you are planning pregnancy. Otherwise the routine of avoiding mosquitoes bites is what is recommended. The statistics are as below very small for the Virgin islands. Puerto Rico 7 (88) 2,474 (98) US Virgin Islands 1 (12) 21 (1) Read more...

Can you tell something about zika virus?

Please repost. Do you mean "call you tell ME something" about the zika virus or do you mean "can you tell" whether someone has contracted it? If it's the first, please repost and explain what you mean by "something." Or, you can learn way more than just "something" about the virus on the website of the Centers for Disease Control. Read more...