How is radiotherapy for breast cancer conducted?

Radiotherapy. Radiotherapy is a treatment to destroy cancer cells with radiation. A beam of radiation is targeted on the cancerous cells, which shrinks the tumour.

Radiotherapy is often used to treat breast cancer, usually after surgery. You're likely to need a course of radiotherapy that lasts for three to five weeks. Radiotherapy is given as an out-patient treatment and each treatment only takes a few minutes but you will need to attend five days a week.
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Related Questions

Is there a period of time you should stay away from children, particularly newborns, after having chemotherapy & radiotherapy for breast cancer?

No. No, unless your breast radiotherapy included permanent radiactive source implant which is very rare, at least in this country. Read more...
Radiotherapy. Depends on what type of treatment you had. Ask your doctor if you are safe around others just to be sure, although you probably are no danger to others. Read more...

Is it common to have muscle/joint problems after having radiotherapy for breast cancer?

Myalgias. Myalgias are common after treatment for a cancer. However, you shoul see your primary care physician to make sure nothing else is taking place. Read more...
No. . Most of the effects of breast irradiation are limited to the breast +/- the chest wall; less so, the chest cavity. The most common systemic side effect is transient lethargy.(tiredness) muscle/joint aches are uncommon; check with your oncologist or internist for other causes. Read more...
No. Symptoms outside of the radiated area are not related to radiation. Radiation therapy is like surgery in that it really only effects where it is pointed. Patients treated with radiation for breast cancer can have some soreness of the chest wall, some patients will have tenderness of the cartilage between the ribs and the sternum. Transient fatigue is the most common side effect. Read more...

Can male breast cancer reoccur in the thyroid after 8 years of mastectomy, radiotherapy and chemotherapy?

Less likely. The thyroid would be an unusual spot for breast cancer to spread. More common sites would be bone, liver, lung and brain. But with cancer, anything is possible. If there is a nodule on the thyroid the best thing to do would be an ultrasound guided biopsy if it looks concerning. Read more...
Yes. Male breast cancer often goes undetected until tumors have been present for a long time and though it would be unusual to recur in the throid your description suggests this was an aggressive breast cancer when first discovered. That would make late metastasis much more likely. Read more...

Could male breast cancer reoccur in the thyroid after eight years of mastectomy, radiotherapy and chemotherapy?

Possible ??? This would be an unusual place for recurrence of male breast cancer to recur. Often ct scans or other studies will show a lesion in the thyroid that is unrelated. I would check with my oncologist. Read more...

Breast cancer 2 yrs ago. Surgery n radiotherapy, opted no meds. A wk ago, GGT 58, sgot 45. Ultrasound cleared, hepatitis a, b, c neg. What should I do?

Stage, ER?PR? You should go to see your oncologist and discuss with your md. What is your stage? Er/pr/her2neu status? What is your cancer marker? Do you take any new medication? A subsequent imaging study like ct scan may be needed. Discuss further with your oncologist. If it is er+ breast cancer, endocrine therapy would be recommended. Read more...
Need additional info. When treated what is the stage of the disease, , is er ;pr positive etc needed to answer , the tests are not the one you do to monitor disease, probably you are disease free , give more information , one of us will advise you. Read more...