6 doctors weighed in:

What are the best treatments for asthma?

6 doctors weighed in
Dr.
1 doctor agrees

In brief: Avoid triggers

Depending on the type of asthma you have, sometimes it is possible to avoid triggers like pollen.
If you are smoking you MUST stop. Otherwise inhalers are the main stay of treatment. There are relieving inhalers, prevention inhalers and some newer ones which do both in one. Have a look at this resource http://www.asthma.org.nz

In brief: Avoid triggers

Depending on the type of asthma you have, sometimes it is possible to avoid triggers like pollen.
If you are smoking you MUST stop. Otherwise inhalers are the main stay of treatment. There are relieving inhalers, prevention inhalers and some newer ones which do both in one. Have a look at this resource http://www.asthma.org.nz
Dr.
Thank
Dr.
1 doctor agrees

In brief: Asthma treatments

1) Avoid precipitants - e.
g. avoid active and passive smoking/ allergens / dust/ work related precipitants
2) Lifestyle changes - diet / regular exercises / weight loss. May need to relocate elsewhere as some parts of NZ have higher asthma rates -e.g. Hamilton
3) Reliever inhalers like ventolin (with correct technique)
4) If not controlled, then inhaled steroids
5) See your GP for ongoing cares

In brief: Asthma treatments

1) Avoid precipitants - e.
g. avoid active and passive smoking/ allergens / dust/ work related precipitants
2) Lifestyle changes - diet / regular exercises / weight loss. May need to relocate elsewhere as some parts of NZ have higher asthma rates -e.g. Hamilton
3) Reliever inhalers like ventolin (with correct technique)
4) If not controlled, then inhaled steroids
5) See your GP for ongoing cares
Dr.
Thank
Dr.
1 doctor agrees

In brief: 3 steps

As the others have said
1) Avoid triggers - smoking, climate if you can, any other known allergens that you're aware of that set it off e.
g. certain plants, animals if this is issue for you
2) Medications - review by your doctor to get right mix of preventers and relievers - may need trial and review and serial treatments
3) rapid assessment by dr if asthma symptoms getting out of control

In brief: 3 steps

As the others have said
1) Avoid triggers - smoking, climate if you can, any other known allergens that you're aware of that set it off e.
g. certain plants, animals if this is issue for you
2) Medications - review by your doctor to get right mix of preventers and relievers - may need trial and review and serial treatments
3) rapid assessment by dr if asthma symptoms getting out of control
Dr.
Thank
Dr. James Ferguson
Pediatrics

In brief: A plan that works

The successful control of asthma focuses on inflammation & spasm of the airways.
Meds like inhaled steroids help control what is a chronic problem with airway irritation. Short acting or long acting anti-spasm drugs like albuterol/salmuterol help re-open airways that spasm in spite of other treatments. A written step wise plan that uses day by day symptoms to add/reduce meds helps the most.

In brief: A plan that works

The successful control of asthma focuses on inflammation & spasm of the airways.
Meds like inhaled steroids help control what is a chronic problem with airway irritation. Short acting or long acting anti-spasm drugs like albuterol/salmuterol help re-open airways that spasm in spite of other treatments. A written step wise plan that uses day by day symptoms to add/reduce meds helps the most.
Dr. James Ferguson
Dr. James Ferguson
Thank
Dr. Robert Kwok
Pediatrics

In brief: Several medications

Bronchodilators such as albuterol (Ventolin, Proventil) or Xopenex (levalbuterol) enlarge the diameter of the airways to help air flow and mucus come out of the lungs.
Patients with cough-variant asthma, exercise-induced asthma, or regular asthma also use steroid inhalers (such as Flovent) to reduce swelling, mucus, and "sensitivity" in the airways. Singulair is another medication that can help.

In brief: Several medications

Bronchodilators such as albuterol (Ventolin, Proventil) or Xopenex (levalbuterol) enlarge the diameter of the airways to help air flow and mucus come out of the lungs.
Patients with cough-variant asthma, exercise-induced asthma, or regular asthma also use steroid inhalers (such as Flovent) to reduce swelling, mucus, and "sensitivity" in the airways. Singulair is another medication that can help.
Dr. Robert Kwok
Dr. Robert Kwok
Thank
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