Treatment for mallet finger?

A mallet finger. Is when the extensor tendon at the tip of a finger ruptures. The rupture of this tendon can involve the tendon alone, be associated with a small bone fragment or fracture or can be associated with a fracture that requires significant care. The fingertip joint cannot extend and droops or lags despite effort to activley extend. http://tinyurl.com/y6wr3ykm.
Varies. It varies somewhat based upon exam and X-ray findings; but in general a splint is used to hold the finger in complete extension for 6 weeks and then used at night for 6 weeks. During the first 6 weeks, it is very important that the splint not be removed if you will be essentially starting over.
SPLINT. Finger needs to be splinted straight Splint must be on full time and not removed for 4 weeks Splint from tip of finger to second knuckle.

Related Questions

Please define what mallet finger is?

A mallet finger . Is when the extensor tendon at the tip of a finger ruptures. The rupture of this tendon can involve the tendon alone, be associated with a small bone fragment or fracture or can be associated with a fracture that requires significant care. The fingertip joint cannot extend and droops or lags despite effort to activley extend. http://www.handctr.com/mallet-finger-baseball-finger-102.html. Read more...
Tendon injury. A mallet finger is a rupture or laceration of the extensor tendon to the tip bone of the finger. Symptoms include a drooping fingertip that is unable to be straightened. Sometimes it is painful, sometimes it is not. Read more...
Tendon rupture. A mallet finger is caused by the extensor tendon which pulls off the last bone in the finger (distal phalanx). Sometimes a piece of the bone also becomes dislodged. This is caused by a sudden flexion force on an extended finger. Read more...

I have a mallet finger that never got treated. Aesthetically, it doesn't look great, but there is no pain. Should I have it looked at?

Your call. If the finger works fine and doesn't hurt, then it's totally your call on whether to get it fixed. Depending on the specif cause and how long it's been since it was injured, you may be able to have it splinted or you may require surgery to fix it. See your doc for an evaluation and possibly a referral to an orthopedist or hand surgeon. Read more...
No. If it doesn't bother you, leave it alone. Surgery would leave a scar and the finger will still be slightly bent. Read more...
Maybe. If the mallet finger is more than 3 months and you have full function, you do not need to get it looked at. If the injury is less than 3 months old, treatment is an option with splinting. Read more...

Could I have mallet finger if I have finger pain?

No. A mallet finger is a deformity of the finger caused by damage to the extensor tendon. Pain only without deformity is not a mallet finger. Read more...
Where is pain. Mallet finger is a rupture of the extensor tendon at the level of the distal interphalyngeal joint requiring 6-8 weeks of splinting for tendon to heal. Primary symptom is inability to extend the distal phalynx with some swelling not pain. Seek a hand surgical evaluation. Read more...
Mallet finger. Pain is one symptom, a droopy joint is seen CommonRX is 8 week of full time and 4weeks of night time and part time activity splinting on the distal joint only . One can work with a mallet fingersplinted . Dirk Nowitzki played in the 2011 nba finals with this injury. But he had a full time trainer http://handcenterwma.blogspot.com/2011/11/mallet-finger-baseball-finger.html. Read more...

Can I take this splint off mallet finger?

Yes, carefully. Splinting for mallet fingers works by keeping the torn end of the extensor tendon closely approximated to the bone. By removing the splint, you risk pulling the tendon away from the bone. This may delay or even prevent healing. The splint should be worn 24hrs/day, 7days/wk for 6 weeks for best results. If you have to remove the splint, keep the tip of the finger hyperextended. Put it back on asap. Read more...

Can I work using splint for a mallet finger?

Depends. On your occupation. Keeping the tip of the effected finger in full extension or some hyperextension is very important for healing. Ask your physician if your occupation allows for this. Best of luck! Read more...
Yes. As long as the finger is allowed to maintain extension in the splint. If the finger is allowed to flex at all it reduces the likelihood of healing and you may be left with an inability to fully extend the finger. Read more...

What could cause a mallet finger injury / bump on finger?

Jamming the tip. Mallet fingers may be associated with a fracture of the distal phalanx and are almost always caused by hitting the tip of the finger. Read more...
A blow to the finger. A blow to the tip of the extended finger causes a mallet finger, either by tearing the tendon or causing a piece of bone to pull off with the tendon. These should be treated with splinting for 6-8 weeks. Read more...