Sleep apnea provent?

Provent. It's effective for certain situations but typically reserved when pap therapy and/or oral appliance therapy have failed.
Ok for some people. It isn't a bad choice for some people who are milder. Many patients utilize it for travel but a few utilize it full time. A repeat sleep study with Provent would show how well it works for you. Many patients tolerate it well, others don't. Talk to your sleep physician to see if it is right for you. .

Related Questions

Does the provent system work for sleep apnea?

Yes, but. It seems to work for mild sleep apnea, though there is only one paper showing this and others have to repeat this finding. It is doubtful if it will work for moderate to severe sleep apnea (apnea-hypopnea index greater than 15/h sleep). Read more...
Yes. Nasal valves (provent) can be effective for sleep apnea especially in patients unable to tolerate cpap. It tends to work best for mild or moderate patients. Read more...

Cure of sleep apnea?

Probably not. Probably no cure but sure can try! weight loss is essential. After that, treatment as advised by a sleep specialist, c-pap and all. One may need a uppp procedure that may "cure" the sleep apnea. Usually a controlled condition. Hold out out hope but don't hold your breath! Read more...
Depends. It depends on the cause (i'm assuming its osa), and the sites of obstruction of your airway. There are a number of surgical options, including palatal reductions (uppp), tonsillectomy, and nasal surgery. Surgery to move both upper and lower jaw bones forward is the closest thing to a surgical cure available, but only in the right patients. See a specialist in your area for more info. Read more...
No cure. There is high failure rate of surgical procedures for sleep apnea. Best treatment is the CPAP mask adjusted to the right pressure. There are some that automatically adjust themselves for the best pressure. Need to get the most comfortable mask & less noisy machine .Complications of surgery include airway obstruction, bleeding, hematoma, infection, pain, death, dysphagia, velopharyngeal etc... Read more...
Technically no. We manage sleep apnea, not necessarily cure it. Treatment options include cpap, oral appliances, weight loss or surgical procedures. Typically, newly diagnosed patients are started out on cpap. Surgery can have a high success rate in the right patient population. Read more...
No real cure. The CPAP machine and the many variations of CPAP are the "gold standard" of care for sleep apnea. But many people can't tolerate the machines for a variety of reasons including comfort, claustrophobia, etc. I get a lot of referrals from sleep specialists in the quad cities to make these patients oral mouthpieces, designed to bring the mandible forward and hold it there which opens up the airway. Read more...
Report of cure. There are report of 90% of cure rate for "bimaxillary advancement osteotomy" from stanford, ca sleep clinics. It is a surgery that might be the second or third stage of different surgeries. If you are 20 year old having severe sleep apnea i might consider this approach. If on the other hand you are 60 y/o, i will stay with CPAP which is the safest treatment of sleep apnea. Read more...
Sleep apnea . There has been many controversies regarding this subject over the years. Tracheotomy is the ultimate solution. However, since this procedure is aggressive and leaves a poor scar, it has remained the last resort. Sleep study is a must to see how severe the signs are. Weight loss, cutting down on alcohol is next. Nares, septum, uvula, tongue, mandible position has to be checked. Read more...
R/O OSA. OSA can be suggested by history and physical. Excess snoring/daytime sleepiness/apneic episodes/ aM headaches. And the Exam obesity/small oral airway/collar size>18. The definitive test is a PSG with split night/CPAP titration. I would request copy of sleep study and get a second opinion if you are not satisfied with the options. You are young CPAP can be difficult to tolerate. ENT FOR UPP EVAL. Read more...

What is sleep apnea?

Stopping breathing. Sleep apnea happens when a person is asleep. Apnea is not breathing (no effort is made to take a breath), or the inabilitiy to breath due to an obstruction (but efforts are made to breathe). Osa is obstructive sleep apnea, which is the common problem heavy snorers have, where the tongue, throat, & neck tissues relax and come together, blocking off air flow and stopping snoring noises momentarily. Read more...
Closed airway. Sleep apnea is the closure of the airway or significant narrowing of the airway during sleep. Risk factors include being male, being overweight, having a large neck, being a snorer and having daytime sleepiness. Sleep apnea increases your risk of stroke, heart attack and high blood pressure. Read more...
Stop breathing. Waking up in the middle of the night gasping for air, snoring, being tired all the time. Read more...
Low blood oxygen . These are typical signs of sleep apnea, a condition which involve periods of ten seconds or more without breathing (apnea) and periods of time with shallow breathing and a significant decrease in blood oxygen levels (hypopnia). This condition can be diagnosed by a sleep specialist with either an overnight at home sleep test or at a sleep clinic utilizing a full psg. Read more...
Sleep apnea. Sleep apnea- a person has pauses in their breathing while sleeping. If left untreated, this can lead to high blood pressure, heart failure, etc. 2 types of sleep apnea-obstructive & central. Obstructive-airways are blocked & lead to pauses. Central-the brain doesn't communicate to your muscles to breathe. More: http://www.nhlbi.nih.gov/health/health-topics/topics/sleepapnea. Read more...

What is sleep apnea?

Not breathing. Apnea is breath-holding, or not breathing. Some people have periods of time they don't breath while they are asleep. Sometimes it is related to body weight, other times it is neurological. Treatment usually involves weight loss, mouthguards to reposition the mouth, or even cpap. If not treated, this can lead to lung/heart problems, chronic fatigue, weight gain, and high blood pressure. Read more...
Choking. There are two types of sleep apnea, both leading to cessation of airflow to the lungs. Central apnea is the less common one and is due to brain controls not sending the signal to breathe. The more common obstructive type is caused by a relaxation of the muscles in the neck to the point of obstruction of airflow. In that situation, there is an effort to breathe, but the windpipe is blocked. Read more...
Sleep Apnea. If you have symptoms such as insomnia snoring hypersomnia excessive daytime sleepiness obesity asian race cognitive deficits mood disorders htn etc increase the chance of sleep apnea rule out other causes, could be medical, genetic long sleeper etc. Read more...
R/O OSA. OSA can be suggested by history and physical. Excess snoring/daytime sleepiness/apneic episodes/ aM headaches. And the Exam obesity/small oral airway/collar size>18. The definitive test is a PSG with split night/CPAP titration. I would request copy of sleep study and get a second opinion if you are not satisfied with the options. You are young CPAP can be difficult to tolerate. ENT FOR UPP EVAL. Read more...

Is sleep apnea common?

Yes. It has been published that it affects 4% of men and 2% of women, but personally, i think it is much higher. Unfortunately, it has been given lower priority than other medical conditions. That is now changing as we are discovering that is is associated with considerable medical and psychiatric morbidity and even mortality. Read more...
Yes. Not only is it very common, but more concerning is that some studies estimate that upto 90% of those with sleep apnea havent been diagnosed with it yet (they don't know they have it). Read more...
Yes. Most people with it are not diagnosed yet. Published numbers are low, and most authors of studies admit that the number is likely much higher. Many people snore and "insist" they don't have apnea. Most of them are wrong and unable to diagnose. Even if a spouse says they don't observe a struggle to breathe, a person can have this life threatening condition. Read more...
R/O OSA. OSA can be suggested by history and physical. Excess snoring/daytime sleepiness/apneic episodes/ aM headaches. And the Exam obesity/small oral airway/collar size>18. The definitive test is a PSG with split night/CPAP titration. I would request copy of sleep study and get a second opinion if you are not satisfied with the options. You are young CPAP can be difficult to tolerate. ENT FOR UPP EVAL. Read more...

Symptoms if sleep apnea?

Insomia. High blood pressure, fatigue and insomnia are one of the most common symptoms associated with sleep apnea. With severe conditions you can be deprived of oxygen to an extent that it may cause death. Please consult your pcp for more information if you think that you have sleep apnea and ask to participate in a sleep study. Read more...
Sleep Apnea. Sleep apnea is when you stop breathing for a period of time while you sleep. Is typically caused be a collapse of the throat closing off the airway. Symptoms include snoring, a general feeling or fatigue or lack of restful sleep. The biggest symptom is if your spouse notices you stop breathing in the middle of the night. This can be fixed with cpap, which pressurizes your airway keeping it open. Read more...
Sleep apnea. Fatigue, snoring, daytime sleepiness, stop breathing for a few seconds while sleeping- are a few symptoms of sleep apnea. Sleep apnea, is frequently associated with increase level of hemoglobin and htn. Sleep study is indicated. CPAP will be the treatment of sleep apnea. Read more...
Multiple. Snoring is a warning sign that sleep apnea may be present. Other complaints include awakening gasping/choking for air, dry mouth/sore throat, urinating multiple times at nights, morning headaches, unrefreshing sleep, cognitive impairment and excessive daytime somnolence. Talk to your doctor about any of these symptoms. A sleep study would have to be done to confirm the diagnosis. Read more...
List. Comprehensive list here: http://www.mayoclinic.org/diseases-conditions/sleep-apnea/basics/symptoms/con-20020286. Read more...

Define mild sleep apnea?

Gasping for air. Sleep apnea is defined as complete (apnea) or partial obstruction (hypopnia) of the airway during sleep. Typical signs and symptoms are snoring, wake up gasping for air, and excessive daytime sleepiness. Diagnosis is made by a sleep study (polysomnogram) and the main parameter of diagnosis is ahi (apnea-hypopnea index). Mild sleep apnea ranges from 5-10 ahi. Read more...
Time reduced oxygen. Apnea refers to the lack of breathing during sleep. This causes a reduction of oxygen in the blood. Mild apnea shows a lesser reduction in oxygen for a shorter time period than moderate or severe apnea. The greater the oxygen reduction over extended time periods, the greater the risks associated its apnea. Read more...
Sleep. If you apnea hyponea index is between 5 and 15 it is mild sleep apnea 15 to 30 is moderate > 30 is severe. Read more...
5-14.9 times an hour. stop breathing between 5 to 14.9 times an hours is mild a sleep apnea, the stopped or decreased breathing ( hypopnea) should be at least for 10 seconds . However, the mild sleep apnea does not mean the Patient has only mild symptoms, some Patients with mild OSA have severe daytime sleepiness and snoring. Read more...

Is sleep apnea inherited?

No. Sleep apnea is not inherited per se. There is no identified gene that causes sleep apnea but it tends to be familial - runs in families. Read more...
Yes. Yes, it is often inherited, but not always. One reason has to do with the fact that we look similar to our relatives. The facial bone growth determines the size of the airway and may be narrow in families with sleep apnea. Other familial factors may be obesity, size of tonsils and adenoids, muscle tone and how we breathe when we sleep. Read more...
NO NOT REALLY. There is no inherent gene to say this. It's more likely the family traits. Obesity is a big one. If you have the same stature as one or both parents, and they have sleep apnea, you're sure to have it too. Regardless, see a sleep specialist and have a sleep study done. If it is weight you can have control over that. Read more...
Depends. What type of sleep apnea? Central or peripheral? I assume you meant peripheral where all patients have an airway issue. This type of sleep apnea depends on the anatomy of the nasal cavity, jaws, tongue, oral cavity and throat with the associated amount of excess tissue. This is not inherited. Read more...
OSA unlikely genetic. Less likely in obstructive sleep apnea. Main cause for obstructive is obesity, some other risk factors include age>50, male sex, comorbidities with diabetes and hypertension, body mass index (more likely in overweight), larger than 17 inch neck (men) and 16 inch (females) and enlarged tonsils. Many doctor have to screen for sleep apnea. But just as s central sleep apnea is more genetic related. Read more...
Genetic. Good question. We need studies to confirm this but genetic basis could be supported in the fact that asian race though not obese have a narrow airway and can have sleep apnea. Read more...

What is sleep apnea like?

Many things. Sleep apnea may be waking up gasping for breath. You are less awake during the day. Driving can be as dangerous as driving drunk. Your attention and concentration is less. It is harder to remember things. You are more irritable and aggressive. It may be harder to keep a job. You will experience more health problems. Treatment can be a breathing machine, surgery, or an oral (dental) appliance. Read more...
Apnea = Suffocation. Like being underwater; unable to breathe. When the co2 in blood gets too high, you blast to surface for a big gasp of air. Osa occurs when airway is blocked during sleep, muscles flaccid/paralyzed. When co2 is too high, brain enters crisis mode, lightens the level of sleep to permit active muscle control and permit a big gasp to replenish o2, then back to deep sleep to do it again. Get osa treated. Read more...
Low blood oxygen . These are typical signs of sleep apnea, a condition which involve periods of ten seconds or more without breathing (apnea) and periods of time with shallow breathing and a significant decrease in blood oxygen levels (hypopnia). This condition can be diagnosed by a sleep specialist with either an overnight at home sleep test or at a sleep clinic utilizing a full psg. Read more...
Tiring. Sleep apnea makes you very tired during the day. You'd nod off while reading or watching television. You may awaken a few times overnight, but the majority of symptoms are actually during the day. Read more...
Hold your breath. Try to exhale then hold your breath for at least ten seconds. Many people have episodes that last more than a minute. Many people with sleep apnea are tired no matter how long they sleep. Imagine being woken up 5 or more times an hour, every hour, for weeks, months, or years. . Read more...
OSA. A disorder in which breathing is frequently interrupted for brief intervals during sleep, Occurs when tissues in the throat collapse and block airflow in and out of the lungs during sleep, resulting in intermittent decreases in blood oxygen levels and transient arousals from sleep, leading to poor sleep quality and excessive daytime sleepiness. Read more...