I have MS. I've had many servical spine and brain MRIs. In the past year or so, I have been very dizzy and pass out occasionally. My neurologist say?

See your neurologist. These are serious symptoms and may be related to the medications which you may be taking or other causes related to your MS. Please see your health care provider soon in order to be evaluated to create a diagnostic and treatment plan.
Varies. There are multiple potential causes. It certainly could be directly related to the ms, or it could be representative of other medical problems such as cardiac arrythmias, middle ear issues, orthostatic hypotension, etc. sometimes just getting a good medical checkup can be a good place to start.

Related Questions

Hi, what are the chances I have MS? I had a clean MRI of brain, with contrast. I have been having some tingly hands, floaters in eyes and dizziness.

Tests for MS. No single test helps diagnose of eliminate MS. A normal MRI however is a strong vote against MS as the cause. Floaters in the eyes and dizziness are not very strong signs of MS either. Tingling in the hands has many causes. For example, high blood sugar causes some of these symptoms. Carpal tunnel syndrome may cause symptoms in the hands. I doubt MS is the cause, but you should keep looking. Read more...
Very Low. Multiple Sclerosis is an autoimmune disease where your immune system attacks the insulation around myelinated nerves. A characteristic finding on MRI would be 'white matter lesions'. However, in fact MS is more of a clinical diagnosis with the most common presentation being visual changes with observable swelling of the optic nerve. It is most commonly found in women of norther european descent. Read more...
Not concerning. The tingling hands could represent carpal tunnel syndrome, the eye floater have no relationship to MS, and the dizziness could be due to many issues, such as anemia, thyroid problems, medication reactions, and inner ear issues. MS quite unlikely here. Read more...

I was told I have ms, but I have a lot of pain, can that happen after several mris, and lab work I was told I have several markers for ms, ie: blurry vision, dizzy, increasing muscle weakness, mental confusion, MRI showed nerve white matter under attack,

Multiple . Multiple sclerosis is a complex syndrome caused by imbalance in the body's own immune system that leads it to attack something called myelin, a substance that insulates nerve cells in the brain and spinal cord. These attacks leave temporary and permanent scars on the brain and spinal cord that can be seen on mri. Symptoms include loss of vision, or loss of feeling or strength in a limb, that may appear and disappear, only to show up in a different spot later on. Spasticity, a condition resulting from poor control of muscle contraction and relaxation, can cause muscle pain, and usually occurs later in the course of the condition. Multiple sclerosis is often thought of as a condition that mostly affects young, white women, but this is a stereotype; men, non-whites, and older people are also affected. Diagnosis of multiple sclerosis is done according to an international standard known as the (revised) mcdonald criteria. These criteria are based on clinical findings, MRI findings, lumbar puncture (spinal tap) findings, and special testing (like evoked potentials). There are also a number of other conditions that can resemble multiple sclerosis symptoms, MRI appearance, and laboratory findings, that may require additional testing to exclude. The less "typical" the presentation, the more important it is to confirm the diagnosis. It is never wrong to consider getting a second opinion. More information about multiple sclerosis can be found at the website of the national multiple sclerosis society http://www.Nationalmssociety.Org/. Read more...
Pain and MS. People with MS can experience pain symptoms directly related to their disease, or from muscle spasm/tightness, or to orthopedic problems related to weakness. Pain is not normally a hallmark of MS, many people with MS have no pain. Perhaps it is time to have a face to face visit with the doctor and review your treatment options. Read more...