10 doctors weighed in:
Is it dangerous for my child to get a vaccine if he is sick?
10 doctors weighed in

Dr. Marcus Degraw
Pediatrics
2 doctors agree
In brief: No
No, it is not dangerous to get vaccines when ill.
Remember that vaccines work by generating an immune response. The immune system needs to respond to the vaccine. If that immune system is very busy - such as fighting a serious infection, then it might not create a strong enough response. So only when seriously ill, shots may just not work as well. They do fine with mild and moderate infection.

In brief: No
No, it is not dangerous to get vaccines when ill.
Remember that vaccines work by generating an immune response. The immune system needs to respond to the vaccine. If that immune system is very busy - such as fighting a serious infection, then it might not create a strong enough response. So only when seriously ill, shots may just not work as well. They do fine with mild and moderate infection.
Dr. Marcus Degraw
Dr. Marcus Degraw
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Dr. Evelyn Hurvitz
Pediatrics
1 doctor agrees
In brief: No
Vaccinations are generally safe to give if a child has a mild illness.
Some providers will reschedule a vaccination if a child has a high fever.

In brief: No
Vaccinations are generally safe to give if a child has a mild illness.
Some providers will reschedule a vaccination if a child has a high fever.
Dr. Evelyn Hurvitz
Dr. Evelyn Hurvitz
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Dr. Pamela Lindor
Pediatrics
1 doctor agrees
In brief: No
Children with mild illness can still be vaccinated.
A child with a high fever, especially if the source of the fever is not clear, should probably wait to get vaccines until they are feeling better.

In brief: No
Children with mild illness can still be vaccinated.
A child with a high fever, especially if the source of the fever is not clear, should probably wait to get vaccines until they are feeling better.
Dr. Pamela Lindor
Dr. Pamela Lindor
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Dr. Paul Trani
Pediatrics
In brief: No
There are no reports of increased adverse reactions in children who are ill receiving vaccines; it is a safe practice.
I do, however, offer my families the opportunity to give the vaccines to their child once they feel better, provided that they'll bring their children back in short order - i guess I have a soft spot for kids who are feeling sick.

In brief: No
There are no reports of increased adverse reactions in children who are ill receiving vaccines; it is a safe practice.
I do, however, offer my families the opportunity to give the vaccines to their child once they feel better, provided that they'll bring their children back in short order - i guess I have a soft spot for kids who are feeling sick.
Dr. Paul Trani
Dr. Paul Trani
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Dr. Kevin Windisch
Pediatrics
In brief: No
As long as your child does not have immune deficiency then all vaccines are safe, even if your child has a fever.
Prior to live virus vaccines immune deificent states must be carefully evaluated.

In brief: No
As long as your child does not have immune deficiency then all vaccines are safe, even if your child has a fever.
Prior to live virus vaccines immune deificent states must be carefully evaluated.
Dr. Kevin Windisch
Dr. Kevin Windisch
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Dr. Robert Kwok
Pediatrics
In brief: No
It is fine for a child to get a vaccine if he or she has a mild cold or other mild illness.
If the child is very sick, then he can return to the doctor's office another time, to get the vaccine.

In brief: No
It is fine for a child to get a vaccine if he or she has a mild cold or other mild illness.
If the child is very sick, then he can return to the doctor's office another time, to get the vaccine.
Dr. Robert Kwok
Dr. Robert Kwok
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Dr. Lisa Roberts
Pediatrics
In brief: No
Most vaccines are inactivated (which means there are no live components that could cause any infection in the baby) and will not transmit the infection they are designed to prevent.
A mild illness does not therefore preclude giving vaccines. Some vaccines are "live" but "attenuated" and some doctors may consider holding those shots while a child is moderately ill.

In brief: No
Most vaccines are inactivated (which means there are no live components that could cause any infection in the baby) and will not transmit the infection they are designed to prevent.
A mild illness does not therefore preclude giving vaccines. Some vaccines are "live" but "attenuated" and some doctors may consider holding those shots while a child is moderately ill.
Dr. Lisa Roberts
Dr. Lisa Roberts
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