How common for person to have consistent fevers from chemo, just before having a bone marrow transplant?

Depends. It depends on the type of chemotherapy you are getting and the type of cancer that is being treated. Although some types of cancers, like leukemias, can cause fevers themselves, it usually isn't a good sign that you are having fevers. Sometimes this is expected but almost always needs a closer look by your doctor. Please call your doctor as soon as possible. Hope this helps.

Related Questions

After high dose chemotherapy, is your marrow destroyed, so you would need a bone marrow transplant?

Not really like that. If the person needs high dose chemo to treat underlying acute leukemia or other kind of blood cancer for instance- the bone marrow transplant is aimed to cure the leukemia/blood cancer-not really to treat the destroyed marrow from chemo. Certain chemo however can cause myelodysplastic syndrome which later can transform into leukemia, and transplant-if possible- would be the treatment option. Read more...
Autologous BMT/SCT. Autologous bmt or stem cell transplant uses the patient's own bone marrow or stem cells to "repopulate" the bone marrow after giving high-doses of chemotherapy or radiation (hdc/rt). The actual treatment is provided by the hdc/rt to eradicate residual cancer cells and the "transplanted" bone marrow/stem cells are just to support the patient from the sure consequence of hdc/rt - marrow failure. Read more...

What is the survival rate of a 73 year old who is done of chemotherapy for 7 days and he is going to have a bone marrow transplant?

Need more informatio. We need to know the Diagnosis(what condition does this patient have? Is it multiple multiple Myeloma or some other blood disorder. Further there are 2 different types of Bone marrow Transplants(BMT): Autologous and Allogeneic....which one is he going to have? Survival is dependent on the diagnosis as well as on the type of BMT. Read more...

Why do they give chemo if myelofibrosis isn't cancer? Also, I've had dr's refer to my "malignancy". Is bone marrow transplant an inevitably?

Misnomer & reason. Neoplasia , new cell growth , the frightening term cancer in relatively benign conditions. In this case of myelofibrosis , progression does not take naive benign course , will take lethal destructive course on bone marrow , the sap of life , all functional cells of bone marrow replaced by fibrous collagen tissue, may not be called malignancy , acts like ca , treated like ca , follow drs advise. Read more...

Flu vacine 2012 child had recent bone marrow transplant is vaccine good idea? Any research on this?

Yes. Bond arrow transplant eliminates the white cells that contain memory of previous illnesses and vaccines. It is recommended to receive certain vaccines including the flu vaccine. Check with the hematologist first though as certain vaccines are live vaccines that should not be received if you are immunosuppressed. Read more...

What are common complications after bone marrow transplant?

Many? Hematopoietic stem cell / bone marrow transplants may not be successful because of disease recurrence or regimen-related toxicity. Regimen-related toxicity refers to side effects that patients may experience during the course of transplantation. These side effects include graft-vs-host disease (gvhd), graft rejection, bacterial infections, fungal infections, viral infections, gastrointestinal . Read more...
Infections and GVHD. Common complications after a bone marrow transplant include being susceptible to a wide range of infectious agents (viruses, bacteria and fungi). In addition, graft versus host disease (gvhd) can occur where the immune cells from the donor recognize the host (patient) as foreign. Gvhd can range from a mild skin rash and a little nausea to being chronically debilitating or fatal. Read more...

How big is the chance of any one person needing a bone marrow transplant?

Small. The diseases that require a transplant are uncommon and there is no database in the United States with information on every stem cell transplant performed. One study estimated the lifetime probability at 0.23% to iust under 1%. Read more...
15,000 a year. It is hard to answer because the number of diseases that require bone marrow transplant vary, and the types of cells used also very. It is estimated that about 15, 000 patients need a bone marrow or umbilical cord blood transplant in the us each year; according to the health resources and services administration. http://bloodcell.transplant.hrsa.gov/about/general_faqs/index.html. Read more...

How does a bone marrow transplant affect a person with hodgkin's lymphoma?

Can be curative. There are a small percentage of hodgkin lymphoma patients who do not respond to standard therapy or relapse after it. For those, stem cell transplant may be an option that can provide cure. We have learned to offer the transplant earlier in the course before a patient has too many failed treatments because there are more complications and a higher death rate in late treatment. Read more...
In many ways. One gets this if the disease is recurrent or very widespread: so it could cure that person. But, a transplant has many side effects. Two main types of transplant happen: allo (another person's marrow and what is used for cure above) and auto (what is used if chemotherapy wipes out your marrow and they want to get your marrow back (if it was stored). The scope of this is best reviewed face to face. Read more...

How can a bone marrow transplant affect a person with hodgkins lymphoma?

It is potentially cu. Using bone marrow transplant to treat hodgkin disease is commonly done procedure and has high success rate. It is typically done in patients who do not achieve good results with first line of chemotherapy.It is a curative procedure in more than half of such patients. Read more...