My dad was diagnosed and died at age 80 with metastatic liver/lung cancer. Will I get it too?

Not likely. Cancer occurring in late life is not likely to have a strong genetic basis. For good health - Have a diet rich in fresh vegetables, fruits, whole grains, milk and milk products, nuts, beans, legumes, lentils and small amounts of lean meats. Avoid saturated fats. Drink enough water daily, so that your urine is mostly colorless. Exercise at least 150 minutes/week and increase the intensity of exercise gradually. Do not use tobacco, alcohol, weed or street drugs in any form. Practice safe sex, if you have sex.
NO. There may be some genetic association with some cancers (eg Breast, Colon) but modern day SCREENING has all but eliminated the possibility of dying from these diesases (they are "caught" PRIOR to metastasizing (spreading)! Hope this is helpful Dr Z.

Related Questions

25 year old with family history of smoking. My father died of lung cancer at the age of 47, my paternal grandpa died of acute respiratory failure at the age of 76, and my maternal grandpa died of prostate cancer at the age of 80. What and when should I te

Time to quit smoking. The hx you give includes various unrelated & common afflictions. The only one you have direct influence on is the lung cancer. Regular history review & general exam by a trusted primary care provider is where you start the process. Any testing must be targeted to the specifics of your issues at the time. Read more...
None. You are 25. Stop smoking. The damage done to your lungs to date should be minimal. If you want a baseline cxr , that can be done, but no other testing would be appropriate for you at this time with no particular symptoms listed. Read more...
Collaboration. If you smoke, you should stop. Collaborative health maintenance is critical to your health. Complete family history, personal history and physical exam should be performed by your family physician. He/she can help with healthy life choices. For screening, the following links to current guidelines: http://goo.Gl/oqvsp. Read more...

Looking for a doctor who specializes in small cell metastatic liver cancer. Can you recommend some in chicago? A friend has just been diagnosed as having inoperable liver/lung cancer. Doctors gave her 7 - 10 months to live. We want to continue the figh

Your . Your best bet would be a cancer program attached to one of the medical schools in chicago, such as northwestern or the university of chicago. Those facilities are used to managing difficult cases like this and have access to research protocols that may not be available elsewhere. It's hard to know, without more information, which specialists would be involved in your friend's case. For example, if there is active, progressive disease in both the liver and lung, and if both sites have been called inoperable, then it will probably be a medical oncologist. If the disease is stable in one site but progressive in the other, then organ-specific local therapy like radiation, radiofrequency ablation, chemoembolization, radioisotope embolization, and other options may exist. In such cases, the group of doctors might expand to include radiation oncologists, surgeons, and interventional radiologists, among others. Read more...
Dr. Ravi Salgia. I personally know dr. Ravi salgia at the university of chicago. He specializes in lung cancers including small cell lung cancer. The university of chicago and northwestern are both superb institutions. Best wishes, ariel. Read more...