Related Questions

I understand that uncomplicated monoclonal gammopathy does not raise the WBC & CRP. But can MGUS lead to more serious conditions that do elevate both WBC & CRP? Would there be ANY other pathological data to look for if a worse condition comes about?

MGUS. http://www.mayoclinic.org/diseases-conditions/mgus/symptoms-causes/dxc-20199538 Regular follow up with a hematologist would identify progression. Check your urine intermittently for proteins; light chains, Bence Jones proteins and check renal function. Today there are many treatments for the varying sequela. Read more...
See below. About 1-2% of the patients with MGUS develop multiple myeloma, a form of bone cancer, each year. It would be prudent to have yearly check ups. You may consult this site for info: http://www.mayoclinic.org/diseases-conditions/mgus/home/ovc-20199535. Read more...

What are possible causes of highly elevated ImM levels with low ImG levels with no monoclonal gammopathy present?

May not be a problem. This may depend on your genetic background and not be a medical problem. We would need an explanation of your problems, blurred vision, night sweats. Why are you on opiates. Read more...
Get a consult. A specialist immunologist may be able to address this. I'm concerned right away about a variant of relatively mild immunodeficiency in which there's difficulty switching from IgM to IgG. Rather than trouble you with the details, let me simply suggest that this belongs in the hands of a subspecialist. Best wishes. Read more...
Several. Our immune B cells produce IgM fist, then switch to IgG or others by a class-switch process. The defective B cell class-switch can result in high IgM, and low IgG. This could be genetically (hyper IgM syndrome) or viral infection or drugs, or lymphoma, etc. . Read more...