Related Questions

Is there a period of time you should stay away from children, particularly newborns, after having chemotherapy & radiotherapy for breast cancer?

No. No, unless your breast radiotherapy included permanent radiactive source implant which is very rare, at least in this country. Read more...
Radiotherapy. Depends on what type of treatment you had. Ask your doctor if you are safe around others just to be sure, although you probably are no danger to others. Read more...

Can male breast cancer reoccur in the thyroid after 8 years of mastectomy, radiotherapy and chemotherapy?

Less likely. The thyroid would be an unusual spot for breast cancer to spread. More common sites would be bone, liver, lung and brain. But with cancer, anything is possible. If there is a nodule on the thyroid the best thing to do would be an ultrasound guided biopsy if it looks concerning. Read more...
Yes. Male breast cancer often goes undetected until tumors have been present for a long time and though it would be unusual to recur in the throid your description suggests this was an aggressive breast cancer when first discovered. That would make late metastasis much more likely. Read more...

Could male breast cancer reoccur in the thyroid after eight years of mastectomy, radiotherapy and chemotherapy?

Possible ??? This would be an unusual place for recurrence of male breast cancer to recur. Often ct scans or other studies will show a lesion in the thyroid that is unrelated. I would check with my oncologist. Read more...

How long should a patient wait before starting chemotherapy and after the breast cancer surgery?

No magic number. The best answer is "as soon as possible", since there is no benefit to waiting (other than allowing a few weeks to recover from surgery). Many clinical trials require that chemotherapy be started within 6 weeks of surgery, but this, too, is arbitrary. I suggest that you talk to your medical oncologist and ask him/her what is best for you. Read more...
8-12 weeks. It depends on the type of breast cancer, but for most breast cancers, studies show that chemotherapy should be started by 12 weeks after surgery. After 12 weeks, the benefit from chemo starts to drop off. If your cancer is more aggressive (triple negative, er negative) you should probably start sooner, ie within 4-6 weeks. Read more...
Depends. In general chemotherapy is started 4 weeks after surgery, ofcourse if surgical wound is well healed and there are no signs of infection. Again, in general no longer than 8 weeks. Each case is different, talk to your oncologist. Read more...
12 weeks. Studies have shown that benefit from chemotherapy doesn't begin to drop off as long as it is started within 12 weeks of surgery. I take the type of cancer into consideration, though. For more aggressive breast cancers, i like to start chemo within 4-6 weeks. For the slower growing er+ cancers, within 12 weeks is fine and supported by data. Read more...

If a breast cancer patient undergoes neo-adjuvant chemotherapy, how will she ever know her true nodal status?

Sentinel LN Biopsy. It is somewhat controversial when to perform sentinel lymph node (ln) biopsy in this setting: some advocate performing this prior to chemo, so as to determine an accurate stage; others believe that the status of the ln after chemo is most pertinent. In my practice, i will perform a needle-biopsy of any abnormal ln prior to chemo. If none are evident, i wait until after chemo. Read more...
She won't. I used to always ask surgeons to do a sentinel node biopsy before neoadjuvant chemotherapy for that very reason. However, newer data show the lymph node status after chemotherapy may be more important. Newer data also show that women don't always need a full axillary dissection with a few positive nodes, so i'm ok with either approach if the lymph nodes aren't enlarged to start. Read more...
"true" nodal status? With neoadj therapy, prognostic infor of staging after therapy is likely the more telling. Studies show slnbx after chemo still accurately predicts axillary nodal status. With current chemo, a 20-25% PCR is not unexpected and would include clearing previously pos nodes (found clinically or on prechemo ax u/s & fna). Delaying the slnbx can thus spare these patients additional axillary surgery. Read more...